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Crossword Solutions for: ???CE

amice

amice
(n.) A square of white linen worn at first on the head, but now about the neck and shoulders, by priests of the Roman Catholic Church while saying Mass.
(n.) A hood, or cape with a hood, made of lined with gray fur, formerly worn by the clergy; -- written also amess, amyss, and almuce.

apace

apace
(adv.) With a quick pace; quick; fast; speedily.

arace

arace
(v. t.) To tear up by the roots; to draw away.

bocce

bocce
Italian bowling played on a long narrow dirt court

bonce

bonce
(n.) A boy's game played with large marbles.

brace

brace
(n.) That which holds anything tightly or supports it firmly; a bandage or a prop.
(n.) A cord, ligament, or rod, for producing or maintaining tension, as a cord on the side of a drum.
(n.) The state of being braced or tight; tension.
(n.) A piece of material used to transmit, or change the direction of, weight or pressure; any one of the pieces, in a frame or truss, which divide the structure into triangular parts. It may act as a tie, or as a strut, and serves to prevent distortion of the structure, and transverse strains in its members. A boiler brace is a diagonal stay, connecting the head with the shell.
(n.) A vertical curved line connecting two or more words or lines, which are to be taken together; thus, boll, bowl; or, in music, used to connect staves.
(n.) A rope reeved through a block at the end of a yard, by which the yard is moved horizontally; also, a rudder gudgeon.
(n.) A curved instrument or handle of iron or wood, for holding and turning bits, etc.; a bitstock.
(n.) A pair; a couple; as, a brace of ducks; now rarely applied to persons, except familiarly or with some contempt.
(n.) Straps or bands to sustain trousers; suspenders.
(n.) Harness; warlike preparation.
(n.) Armor for the arm; vantbrace.
(n.) The mouth of a shaft.
(v. i.) To get tone or vigor; to rouse one's energies; -- with up.
(v. t.) To furnish with braces; to support; to prop; as, to brace a beam in a building.
(v. t.) To draw tight; to tighten; to put in a state of tension; to strain; to strengthen; as, to brace the nerves.
(v. t.) To bind or tie closely; to fasten tightly.
(v. t.) To place in a position for resisting pressure; to hold firmly; as, he braced himself against the crowd.
(v. t.) To move around by means of braces; as, to brace the yards.

bruce

bruce
King of Scotland from 1306 to 1329; defeated the English army under Edward II at Bannockburn and gained recognition of Scottish independence (1274-1329)
Australian physician and bacteriologist who described the bacterium that causes undulant fever or brucellosis (1855-1931)

chace

chace
(n.) See 3d Chase, n., 3.
(v. t.) To pursue. See Chase v. t.

circe

circe
(Greek mythology) a sorceress who detained Odysseus on her island and turned his men into swine

dance

dance
(v. i.) To move with measured steps, or to a musical accompaniment; to go through, either alone or in company with others, with a regulated succession of movements, (commonly) to the sound of music; to trip or leap rhythmically.
(v. i.) To move nimbly or merrily; to express pleasure by motion; to caper; to frisk; to skip about.
(v. i.) The leaping, tripping, or measured stepping of one who dances; an amusement, in which the movements of the persons are regulated by art, in figures and in accord with music.
(v. i.) A tune by which dancing is regulated, as the minuet, the waltz, the cotillon, etc.
(v. t.) To cause to dance, or move nimbly or merrily about, or up and down; to dandle.

deice

deice
Make or become free of frost or ice; "Defrost the car window"

deuce

deuce
(n.) Two; a card or a die with two spots; as, the deuce of hearts.
(n.) A condition of the score beginning whenever each side has won three strokes in the same game (also reckoned "40 all"), and reverted to as often as a tie is made until one of the sides secures two successive strokes following a tie or deuce, which decides the game.
(n.) The devil; a demon.

dolce

dolce
(adv.) Alt. of Dolcemente

douce

douce
(a.) Sweet; pleasant.
(a.) Sober; prudent; sedate; modest.

dulce

dulce
(v. t.) To make sweet; to soothe.

dunce

dunce
(n.) One backward in book learning; a child or other person dull or weak in intellect; a dullard; a dolt.

educe

educe
(v. t.) To bring or draw out; to cause to appear; to produce against counter agency or influence; to extract; to evolve; as, to educe a form from matter.

farce

farce
(v. t.) To stuff with forcemeat; hence, to fill with mingled ingredients; to fill full; to stuff.
(v. t.) To render fat.
(v. t.) To swell out; to render pompous.
(v. t.) Stuffing, or mixture of viands, like that used on dressing a fowl; forcemeat.
(v. t.) A low style of comedy; a dramatic composition marked by low humor, generally written with little regard to regularity or method, and abounding with ludicrous incidents and expressions.
(v. t.) Ridiculous or empty show; as, a mere farce.

fence

fence
(n.) That which fends off attack or danger; a defense; a protection; a cover; security; shield.
(n.) An inclosure about a field or other space, or about any object; especially, an inclosing structure of wood, iron, or other material, intended to prevent intrusion from without or straying from within.
(n.) A projection on the bolt, which passes through the tumbler gates in locking and unlocking.
(n.) Self-defense by the use of the sword; the art and practice of fencing and sword play; hence, skill in debate and repartee. See Fencing.
(n.) A receiver of stolen goods, or a place where they are received.
(v. i.) To make a defense; to guard one's self of anything, as against an attack; to give protection or security, as by a fence.
(v. i.) To practice the art of attack and defense with the sword or with the foil, esp. with the smallsword, using the point only.
(v. i.) Hence, to fight or dispute in the manner of fencers, that is, by thrusting, guarding, parrying, etc.
(v. t.) To fend off danger from; to give security to; to protect; to guard.
(v. t.) To inclose with a fence or other protection; to secure by an inclosure.

force

force
(n.) A waterfall; a cascade.
(n.) Strength or energy of body or mind; active power; vigor; might; often, an unusual degree of strength or energy; capacity of exercising an influence or producing an effect; especially, power to persuade, or convince, or impose obligation; pertinency; validity; special signification; as, the force of an appeal, an argument, a contract, or a term.
(n.) Power exerted against will or consent; compulsory power; violence; coercion.
(n.) Strength or power for war; hence, a body of land or naval combatants, with their appurtenances, ready for action; -- an armament; troops; warlike array; -- often in the plural; hence, a body of men prepared for action in other ways; as, the laboring force of a plantation.
(n.) Strength or power exercised without law, or contrary to law, upon persons or things; violence.
(n.) Validity; efficacy.
(n.) Any action between two bodies which changes, or tends to change, their relative condition as to rest or motion; or, more generally, which changes, or tends to change, any physical relation between them, whether mechanical, thermal, chemical, electrical, magnetic, or of any other kind; as, the force of gravity; cohesive force; centrifugal force.
(n.) To constrain to do or to forbear, by the exertion of a power not resistible; to compel by physical, moral, or intellectual means; to coerce; as, masters force slaves to labor.
(n.) To compel, as by strength of evidence; as, to force conviction on the mind.
(n.) To do violence to; to overpower, or to compel by violence to one;s will; especially, to ravish; to violate; to commit rape upon.
(n.) To obtain or win by strength; to take by violence or struggle; specifically, to capture by assault; to storm, as a fortress.
(n.) To impel, drive, wrest, extort, get, etc., by main strength or violence; -- with a following adverb, as along, away, from, into, through, out, etc.
(n.) To put in force; to cause to be executed; to make binding; to enforce.
(n.) To exert to the utmost; to urge; hence, to strain; to urge to excessive, unnatural, or untimely action; to produce by unnatural effort; as, to force a consient or metaphor; to force a laugh; to force fruits.
(n.) To compel (an adversary or partner) to trump a trick by leading a suit of which he has none.
(n.) To provide with forces; to reenforce; to strengthen by soldiers; to man; to garrison.
(n.) To allow the force of; to value; to care for.
(v. i.) To use violence; to make violent effort; to strive; to endeavor.
(v. i.) To make a difficult matter of anything; to labor; to hesitate; hence, to force of, to make much account of; to regard.
(v. i.) To be of force, importance, or weight; to matter.
(v. t.) To stuff; to lard; to farce.
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