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Crossword Solver Answers for: ???NGE

avenge

avenge
(n.) Vengeance; revenge.
(v. i.) To take vengeance.
(v. t.) To take vengeance for; to exact satisfaction for by punishing the injuring party; to vindicate by inflicting pain or evil on a wrongdoer.
(v. t.) To treat revengefully; to wreak vengeance on.

axunge

axunge
(n.) Fat; grease; esp. the fat of pigs or geese; usually (Pharm.), lard prepared for medical use.

blunge

blunge
(v. t.) To amalgamate and blend; to beat up or mix in water, as clay.

change

change
(v. i.) To be altered; to undergo variation; as, men sometimes change for the better.
(v. i.) To pass from one phase to another; as, the moon changes to-morrow night.
(v. t.) To alter; to make different; to cause to pass from one state to another; as, to change the position, character, or appearance of a thing; to change the countenance.
(v. t.) To alter by substituting something else for, or by giving up for something else; as, to change the clothes; to change one's occupation; to change one's intention.
(v. t.) To give and take reciprocally; to exchange; -- followed by with; as, to change place, or hats, or money, with another.
(v. t.) Specifically: To give, or receive, smaller denominations of money (technically called change) for; as, to change a gold coin or a bank bill.
(v. t.) Any variation or alteration; a passing from one state or form to another; as, a change of countenance; a change of habits or principles.
(v. t.) A succesion or substitution of one thing in the place of another; a difference; novelty; variety; as, a change of seasons.
(v. t.) A passing from one phase to another; as, a change of the moon.
(v. t.) Alteration in the order of a series; permutation.
(v. t.) That which makes a variety, or may be substituted for another.
(v. t.) Small money; the money by means of which the larger coins and bank bills are made available in small dealings; hence, the balance returned when payment is tendered by a coin or note exceeding the sum due.
(v. t.) A place where merchants and others meet to transact business; a building appropriated for mercantile transactions.
(v. t.) A public house; an alehouse.
(v. t.) Any order in which a number of bells are struck, other than that of the diatonic scale.

cringe

cringe
(n.) Servile civility; fawning; a shrinking or bowing, as in fear or servility.
(v. t.) To draw one's self together as in fear or servility; to bend or crouch with base humility; to wince; hence; to make court in a degrading manner; to fawn.
(v. t.) To contract; to draw together; to cause to shrink or wrinkle; to distort.

elenge

elenge
(a.) Sorrowful; wretched; full of trouble.

flange

flange
(n.) An external or internal rib, or rim, for strength, as the flange of an iron beam; or for a guide, as the flange of a car wheel (see Car wheel.); or for attachment to another object, as the flange on the end of a pipe, steam cylinder, etc.
(n.) A plate or ring to form a rim at the end of a pipe when fastened to the pipe.
(v. i.) To be bent into a flange.
(v. t.) To make a flange on; to furnish with a flange.

fringe

fringe
(n.) An ornamental appendage to the border of a piece of stuff, originally consisting of the ends of the warp, projecting beyond the woven fabric; but more commonly made separate and sewed on, consisting sometimes of projecting ends, twisted or plaited together, and sometimes of loose threads of wool, silk, or linen, or narrow strips of leather, or the like.
(n.) Something resembling in any respect a fringe; a line of objects along a border or edge; a border; an edging; a margin; a confine.
(n.) One of a number of light or dark bands, produced by the interference of light; a diffraction band; -- called also interference fringe.
(n.) The peristome or fringelike appendage of the capsules of most mosses. See Peristome.
(v. t.) To adorn the edge of with a fringe or as with a fringe.

grange

grange
(n.) A building for storing grain; a granary.
(n.) A farmhouse, with the barns and other buildings for farming purposes.
(n.) A farmhouse of a monastery, where the rents and tithes, paid in grain, were deposited.
(n.) A farm; generally, a farm with a house at a distance from neighbors.
(n.) An association of farmers, designed to further their interests, aud particularly to bring producers and consumers, farmers and manufacturers, into direct commercial relations, without intervention of middlemen or traders. The first grange was organized in 1867.

grunge

grunge
The state of being covered with unclean things

lounge

lounge
(a.) To spend time lazily, whether lolling or idly sauntering; to pass time indolently; to stand, sit, or recline, in an indolent manner.
(n.) An idle gait or stroll; the state of reclining indolently; a place of lounging.
(n.) A piece of furniture resembling a sofa, upon which one may lie or recline.

orange

orange
(a.) Of or pertaining to an orange; of the color of an orange; reddish yellow; as, an orange ribbon.
(n.) The fruit of a tree of the genus Citrus (C. Aurantium). It is usually round, and consists of pulpy carpels, commonly ten in number, inclosed in a leathery rind, which is easily separable, and is reddish yellow when ripe.
(n.) The tree that bears oranges; the orange tree.
(n.) The color of an orange; reddish yellow.

peenge

peenge
(v. i.) To complain.

plonge

plonge
(v. t.) To cleanse, as open drains which are entered by the tide, by stirring up the sediment when the tide ebbs.

plunge

plunge
(n.) The act of thrusting into or submerging; a dive, leap, rush, or pitch into, or as into, water; as, to take the water with a plunge.
(n.) Hence, a desperate hazard or act; a state of being submerged or overwhelmed with difficulties.
(n.) The act of pitching or throwing one's self headlong or violently forward, like an unruly horse.
(n.) Heavy and reckless betting in horse racing; hazardous speculation.
(v. i.) To thrust or cast one's self into water or other fluid; to submerge one's self; to dive, or to rush in; as, he plunged into the river. Also used figuratively; as, to plunge into debt.
(v. i.) To pitch or throw one's self headlong or violently forward, as a horse does.
(v. i.) To bet heavily and with seeming recklessness on a race, or other contest; in an extended sense, to risk large sums in hazardous speculations.
(v. t.) To thrust into water, or into any substance that is penetrable; to immerse; to cause to penetrate or enter quickly and forcibly; to thrust; as, to plunge the body into water; to plunge a dagger into the breast. Also used figuratively; as, to plunge a nation into war.
(v. t.) To baptize by immersion.
(v. t.) To entangle; to embarrass; to overcome.

sponge

sponge
(n.) Any one of numerous species of Spongiae, or Porifera. See Illust. and Note under Spongiae.
(n.) The elastic fibrous skeleton of many species of horny Spongiae (keratosa), used for many purposes, especially the varieties of the genus Spongia. The most valuable sponges are found in the Mediterranean and the Red Sea, and on the coasts of Florida and the West Indies.
(n.) One who lives upon others; a pertinaceous and indolent dependent; a parasite; a sponger.
(n.) Any spongelike substance.
(n.) Dough before it is kneaded and formed into loaves, and after it is converted into a light, spongy mass by the agency of the yeast or leaven.
(n.) Iron from the puddling furnace, in a pasty condition.
(n.) Iron ore, in masses, reduced but not melted or worked.
(n.) A mop for cleaning the bore of a cannon after a discharge. It consists of a cylinder of wood, covered with sheepskin with the wool on, or cloth with a heavy looped nap, and having a handle, or staff.
(n.) The extremity, or point, of a horseshoe, answering to the heel.
(v. i.) To suck in, or imbile, as a sponge.
(v. i.) Fig.: To gain by mean arts, by intrusion, or hanging on; as, an idler sponges on his neighbor.
(v. i.) To be converted, as dough, into a light, spongy mass by the agency of yeast, or leaven.
(v. t.) To cleanse or wipe with a sponge; as, to sponge a slate or a cannon; to wet with a sponge; as, to sponge cloth.
(v. t.) To wipe out with a sponge, as letters or writing; to efface; to destroy all trace of.
(v. t.) Fig.: To deprive of something by imposition.
(v. t.) Fig.: To get by imposition or mean arts without cost; as, to sponge a breakfast.

swinge

swinge
(n.) The sweep of anything in motion; a swinging blow; a swing.
(n.) Power; sway; influence.
(v. & n.) See Singe.
(v. t.) To beat soundly; to whip; to chastise; to punish.
(v. t.) To move as a lash; to lash.

twinge

twinge
(n.) A pinch; a tweak; a twitch.
(n.) A sudden sharp pain; a darting local pain of momentary continuance; as, a twinge in the arm or side.
(v. i.) To pull with a twitch; to pinch; to tweak.
(v. i.) To affect with a sharp, sudden pain; to torment with pinching or sharp pains.
(v. i.) To have a sudden, sharp, local pain, like a twitch; to suffer a keen, darting, or shooting pain; as, the side twinges.