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Crossword Solutions for: ??A?E

abase

abase
(a.) To lower or depress; to throw or cast down; as, to abase the eye.
(a.) To cast down or reduce low or lower, as in rank, office, condition in life, or estimation of worthiness; to depress; to humble; to degrade.

abate

abate
(n.) Abatement.
(v. t.) To beat down; to overthrow.
(v. t.) To bring down or reduce from a higher to a lower state, number, or degree; to lessen; to diminish; to contract; to moderate; to cut short; as, to abate a demand; to abate pride, zeal, hope.
(v. t.) To deduct; to omit; as, to abate something from a price.
(v. t.) To blunt.
(v. t.) To reduce in estimation; to deprive.
(v. t.) To bring entirely down or put an end to; to do away with; as, to abate a nuisance, to abate a writ.
(v. t.) To diminish; to reduce. Legacies are liable to be abated entirely or in proportion, upon a deficiency of assets.
(v. t.) To decrease, or become less in strength or violence; as, pain abates, a storm abates.
(v. t.) To be defeated, or come to naught; to fall through; to fail; as, a writ abates.

adage

adage
(n.) An old saying, which has obtained credit by long use; a proverb.

agape

agape
(adv. & a.) Gaping, as with wonder, expectation, or eager attention.
(n.) The love feast of the primitive Christians, being a meal partaken of in connection with the communion.

agate

agate
(adv.) On the way; agoing; as, to be agate; to set the bells agate.
(n.) A semipellucid, uncrystallized variety of quartz, presenting various tints in the same specimen. Its colors are delicately arranged in stripes or bands, or blended in clouds.
(n.) A kind of type, larger than pearl and smaller than nonpareil; in England called ruby.
(n.) A diminutive person; so called in allusion to the small figures cut in agate for rings and seals.
(n.) A tool used by gold-wire drawers, bookbinders, etc.; -- so called from the agate fixed in it for burnishing.

agave

agave
(n.) A genus of plants (order Amaryllidaceae) of which the chief species is the maguey or century plant (A. Americana), wrongly called Aloe. It is from ten to seventy years, according to climate, in attaining maturity, when it produces a gigantic flower stem, sometimes forty feet in height, and perishes. The fermented juice is the pulque of the Mexicans; distilled, it yields mescal. A strong thread and a tough paper are made from the leaves, and the wood has many uses.

alate

alate
(a.) Alt. of Alated
(adv.) Lately; of late.

amate

amate
(v. t.) To dismay; to dishearten; to daunt.
(v. t.) To be a mate to; to match.

amaze

amaze
(v. i.) To be astounded.
(v. t.) To bewilder; to stupefy; to bring into a maze.
(v. t.) To confound, as by fear, wonder, extreme surprise; to overwhelm with wonder; to astound; to astonish greatly.
(v. t.) Bewilderment, arising from fear, surprise, or wonder; amazement.

apace

apace
(adv.) With a quick pace; quick; fast; speedily.

arace

arace
(v. t.) To tear up by the roots; to draw away.

atake

atake
(v. t.) To overtake.

avale

avale
(v. t. & i.) To cause to descend; to lower; to let fall; to doff.
(v. t. & i.) To bring low; to abase.
(v. t. & i.) To descend; to fall; to dismount.

awake

awake
(a.) Not sleeping or lethargic; roused from sleep; in a state of vigilance or action.
(v. i.) To cease to sleep; to come out of a state of natural sleep; and, figuratively, out of a state resembling sleep, as inaction or death.
(v. t.) To rouse from sleep; to wake; to awaken.
(v. t.) To rouse from a state resembling sleep, as from death, stupidity., or inaction; to put into action; to give new life to; to stir up; as, to awake the dead; to awake the dormant faculties.

aware

aware
(a.) Watchful; vigilant or on one's guard against danger or difficulty.
(a.) Apprised; informed; cognizant; conscious; as, he was aware of the enemy's designs.

blade

blade
(n.) Properly, the leaf, or flat part of the leaf, of any plant, especially of gramineous plants. The term is sometimes applied to the spire of grasses.
(n.) The cutting part of an instrument; as, the blade of a knife or a sword.
(n.) The broad part of an oar; also, one of the projecting arms of a screw propeller.
(n.) The scapula or shoulder blade.
(n.) The principal rafters of a roof.
(n.) The four large shell plates on the sides, and the five large ones of the middle, of the carapace of the sea turtle, which yield the best tortoise shell.
(n.) A sharp-witted, dashing, wild, or reckless, fellow; -- a word of somewhat indefinite meaning.
(v. i.) To put forth or have a blade.
(v. t.) To furnish with a blade.

blake

blake
Visionary British poet and painter (1757-1827)
Sir Peter - English pop artist who created the sleeve design for the Beatles' album Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band.

blame

blame
(v.) An expression of disapprobation fir something deemed to be wrong; imputation of fault; censure.
(v.) That which is deserving of censure or disapprobation; culpability; fault; crime; sin.
(v.) Hurt; injury.
(v. t.) To censure; to express disapprobation of; to find fault with; to reproach.
(v. t.) To bring reproach upon; to blemish.

blare

blare
(n.) The harsh noise of a trumpet; a loud and somewhat harsh noise, like the blast of a trumpet; a roar or bellowing.
(v. i.) To sound loudly and somewhat harshly.
(v. t.) To cause to sound like the blare of a trumpet; to proclaim loudly.

blase

blase
(a.) Having the sensibilities deadened by excess or frequency of enjoyment; sated or surfeited with pleasure; used up.

blate

blate
Cry plaintively; "The lambs were bleating"
Disposed to avoid notice; "they considered themselves a tough outfit and weren't bashful about letting anybody know it"; (`blate' is a Scottish term for bashful)

blaze

blaze
(n.) A stream of gas or vapor emitting light and heat in the process of combustion; a bright flame.
(n.) Intense, direct light accompanied with heat; as, to seek shelter from the blaze of the sun.
(n.) A bursting out, or active display of any quality; an outburst; a brilliant display.
(n.) A white spot on the forehead of a horse.
(n.) A spot made on trees by chipping off a piece of the bark, usually as a surveyor's mark.
(v. i.) To shine with flame; to glow with flame; as, the fire blazes.
(v. i.) To send forth or reflect glowing or brilliant light; to show a blaze.
(v. i.) To be resplendent.
(v. i.) To make public far and wide; to make known; to render conspicuous.
(v. i.) To blazon.
(v. t.) To mark (a tree) by chipping off a piece of the bark.
(v. t.) To designate by blazing; to mark out, as by blazed trees; as, to blaze a line or path.

brace

brace
(n.) That which holds anything tightly or supports it firmly; a bandage or a prop.
(n.) A cord, ligament, or rod, for producing or maintaining tension, as a cord on the side of a drum.
(n.) The state of being braced or tight; tension.
(n.) A piece of material used to transmit, or change the direction of, weight or pressure; any one of the pieces, in a frame or truss, which divide the structure into triangular parts. It may act as a tie, or as a strut, and serves to prevent distortion of the structure, and transverse strains in its members. A boiler brace is a diagonal stay, connecting the head with the shell.
(n.) A vertical curved line connecting two or more words or lines, which are to be taken together; thus, boll, bowl; or, in music, used to connect staves.
(n.) A rope reeved through a block at the end of a yard, by which the yard is moved horizontally; also, a rudder gudgeon.
(n.) A curved instrument or handle of iron or wood, for holding and turning bits, etc.; a bitstock.
(n.) A pair; a couple; as, a brace of ducks; now rarely applied to persons, except familiarly or with some contempt.
(n.) Straps or bands to sustain trousers; suspenders.
(n.) Harness; warlike preparation.
(n.) Armor for the arm; vantbrace.
(n.) The mouth of a shaft.
(v. i.) To get tone or vigor; to rouse one's energies; -- with up.
(v. t.) To furnish with braces; to support; to prop; as, to brace a beam in a building.
(v. t.) To draw tight; to tighten; to put in a state of tension; to strain; to strengthen; as, to brace the nerves.
(v. t.) To bind or tie closely; to fasten tightly.
(v. t.) To place in a position for resisting pressure; to hold firmly; as, he braced himself against the crowd.
(v. t.) To move around by means of braces; as, to brace the yards.

brahe

brahe
Danish astronomer whose observations of the planets provided the basis for Kepler's laws of planetary motion (1546-1601)

brake

brake
Imp. of Break.
Of Break
(n.) A fern of the genus Pteris, esp. the P. aquilina, common in almost all countries. It has solitary stems dividing into three principal branches. Less properly: Any fern.
(n.) A thicket; a place overgrown with shrubs and brambles, with undergrowth and ferns, or with canes.
(v. t.) An instrument or machine to break or bruise the woody part of flax or hemp so that it may be separated from the fiber.
(v. t.) An extended handle by means of which a number of men can unite in working a pump, as in a fire engine.
(v. t.) A baker's kneading though.
(v. t.) A sharp bit or snaffle.
(v. t.) A frame for confining a refractory horse while the smith is shoeing him; also, an inclosure to restrain cattle, horses, etc.
(v. t.) That part of a carriage, as of a movable battery, or engine, which enables it to turn.
(v. t.) An ancient engine of war analogous to the crossbow and ballista.
(v. t.) A large, heavy harrow for breaking clods after plowing; a drag.
(v. t.) A piece of mechanism for retarding or stopping motion by friction, as of a carriage or railway car, by the pressure of rubbers against the wheels, or of clogs or ratchets against the track or roadway, or of a pivoted lever against a wheel or drum in a machine.
(v. t.) An apparatus for testing the power of a steam engine, or other motor, by weighing the amount of friction that the motor will overcome; a friction brake.
(v. t.) A cart or carriage without a body, used in breaking in horses.
(v. t.) An ancient instrument of torture.
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