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Crossword Solver Answers for: ??ALL

myall

myall
Australian acacia with hard scented wood

scall

scall
(a.) A scurf or scabby disease, especially of the scalp.
(a.) Scabby; scurfy.

shall

shall
(v. i. & auxiliary.) To owe; to be under obligation for.
(v. i. & auxiliary.) To be obliged; must.
(v. i. & auxiliary.) As an auxiliary, shall indicates a duty or necessity whose obligation is derived from the person speaking; as, you shall go; he shall go; that is, I order or promise your going. It thus ordinarily expresses, in the second and third persons, a command, a threat, or a promise. If the auxillary be emphasized, the command is made more imperative, the promise or that more positive and sure. It is also employed in the language of prophecy; as, "the day shall come when . . . , " since a promise or threat and an authoritative prophecy nearly coincide in significance. In shall with the first person, the necessity of the action is sometimes implied as residing elsewhere than in the speaker; as, I shall suffer; we shall see; and there is always a less distinct and positive assertion of his volition than is indicated by will. "I shall go" implies nearly a simple futurity; more exactly, a foretelling or an expectation of my going, in which, naturally enough, a certain degree of plan or intention may be included; emphasize the shall, and the event is described as certain to occur, and the expression approximates in meaning to our emphatic "I will go." In a question, the relation of speaker and source of obligation is of course transferred to the person addressed; as, "Shall you go?" (answer, "I shall go"); "Shall he go?" i. e., "Do you require or promise his going?" (answer, "He shall go".) The same relation is transferred to either second or third person in such phrases as "You say, or think, you shall go;" "He says, or thinks, he shall go." After a conditional conjunction (as if, whether) shall is used in all persons to express futurity simply; as, if I, you, or he shall say they are right. Should is everywhere used in the same connection and the same senses as shall, as its imperfect. It also expresses duty or moral obligation; as, he should do it whether he will or not. In the early English, and hence in our English Bible, shall is the auxiliary mainly used, in all the persons, to express simple futurity. (Cf. Will, v. t.) Shall may be used elliptically; thus, with an adverb or other word expressive of motion go may be omitted.

skall

skall
(v. t.) To scale; to mount.

small

small
(adv.) In or to small extent, quantity, or degree; little; slightly.
(adv.) Not loudly; faintly; timidly.
(n.) The small or slender part of a thing; as, the small of the leg or of the back.
(n.) Smallclothes.
(n.) Same as Little go. See under Little, a.
(superl.) Having little size, compared with other things of the same kind; little in quantity or degree; diminutive; not large or extended in dimension; not great; not much; inconsiderable; as, a small man; a small river.
(superl.) Being of slight consequence; feeble in influence or importance; unimportant; trivial; insignificant; as, a small fault; a small business.
(superl.) Envincing little worth or ability; not large-minded; -- sometimes, in reproach, paltry; mean.
(superl.) Not prolonged in duration; not extended in time; short; as, after a small space.
(superl.) Weak; slender; fine; gentle; soft; not loud.
(v. t.) To make little or less.

spall

spall
(n.) The shoulder.
(n.) A chip or fragment, especially a chip of stone as struck off the block by the hammer, having at least one feather-edge.
(v. i.) To give off spalls, or wedge-shaped chips; -- said of stone, as when badly set, with the weight thrown too much on the outer surface.
(v. t.) To break into small pieces, as ore, for the purpose of separating from rock.
(v. t.) To reduce, as irregular blocks of stone, to an approximately level surface by hammering.

stall

stall
(v. i.) A stand; a station; a fixed spot; hence, the stand or place where a horse or an ox kept and fed; the division of a stable, or the compartment, for one horse, ox, or other animal.
(v. i.) A stable; a place for cattle.
(v. i.) A small apartment or shed in which merchandise is exposed for sale; as, a butcher's stall; a bookstall.
(v. i.) A bench or table on which small articles of merchandise are exposed for sale.
(v. i.) A seat in the choir of a church, for one of the officiating clergy. It is inclosed, either wholly or partially, at the back and sides. The stalls are frequently very rich, with canopies and elaborate carving.
(v. i.) In the theater, a seat with arms or otherwise partly inclosed, as distinguished from the benches, sofas, etc.
(v. i.) The space left by excavation between pillars. See Post and stall, under Post.
(v. i.) To live in, or as in, a stall; to dwell.
(v. i.) To kennel, as dogs.
(v. i.) To be set, as in mire or snow; to stick fast.
(v. i.) To be tired of eating, as cattle.
(v. t.) To put into a stall or stable; to keep in a stall or stalls; as, to stall an ox.
(v. t.) To fatten; as, to stall cattle.
(v. t.) To place in an office with the customary formalities; to install.
(v. t.) To plunge into mire or snow so as not to be able to get on; to set; to fix; as, to stall a cart.
(v. t.) To forestall; to anticipitate. Having
(v. t.) To keep close; to keep secret.

tyall

ty-all
(n.) Something serving to tie or secure.

whall

whall
(n.) A light color of the iris in horses; wall-eye.