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Crossword Solver Answers for: ??DGE

badge

badge
(n.) A distinctive mark, token, sign, or cognizance, worn on the person; as, the badge of a society; the badge of a policeman.
(n.) Something characteristic; a mark; a token.
(n.) A carved ornament on the stern of a vessel, containing a window or the representation of one.
(v. t.) To mark or distinguish with a badge.

bodge

bodge
(n.) A botch; a patch.
(v. i.) See Budge.
(v. t.) To botch; to mend clumsily; to patch.

budge

budge
(a.) Lined with budge; hence, scholastic.
(a.) Austere or stiff, like scholastics.
(n.) A kind of fur prepared from lambskin dressed with the wool on; -- used formerly as an edging and ornament, esp. of scholastic habits.
(v.) Brisk; stirring; jocund.
(v. i.) To move off; to stir; to walk away.

cadge

cadge
(n.) A circular frame on which cadgers carry hawks for sale.
(v. t. & i.) To carry, as a burden.
(v. t. & i.) To hawk or peddle, as fish, poultry, etc.
(v. t. & i.) To intrude or live on another meanly; to beg.

dodge

dodge
(n.) The act of evading by some skillful movement; a sudden starting aside; hence, an artful device to evade, deceive, or cheat; a cunning trick; an artifice.
(v. i.) To start suddenly aside, as to avoid a blow or a missile; to shift place by a sudden start.
(v. i.) To evade a duty by low craft; to practice mean shifts; to use tricky devices; to play fast and loose; to quibble.
(v. t.) To evade by a sudden shift of place; to escape by starting aside; as, to dodge a blow aimed or a ball thrown.
(v. t.) Fig.: To evade by craft; as, to dodge a question; to dodge responsibility.
(v. t.) To follow by dodging, or suddenly shifting from place to place.

fadge

fadge
(a.) To fit; to suit; to agree.
(n.) A small flat loaf or thick cake; also, a fagot.

fidge

fidge
(n. & i.) See Fidget.

fudge

fudge
(n.) A made-up story; stuff; nonsense; humbug; -- often an exclamation of contempt.
(v. t.) To make up; to devise; to contrive; to fabricate.
(v. t.) To foist; to interpolate.

hedge

hedge
(n.) A thicket of bushes, usually thorn bushes; especially, such a thicket planted as a fence between any two portions of land; and also any sort of shrubbery, as evergreens, planted in a line or as a fence; particularly, such a thicket planted round a field to fence it, or in rows to separate the parts of a garden.
(v. i.) To shelter one's self from danger, risk, duty, responsibility, etc., as if by hiding in or behind a hedge; to skulk; to slink; to shirk obligations.
(v. i.) To reduce the risk of a wager by making a bet against the side or chance one has bet on.
(v. i.) To use reservations and qualifications in one's speech so as to avoid committing one's self to anything definite.
(v. t.) To inclose or separate with a hedge; to fence with a thickly set line or thicket of shrubs or small trees; as, to hedge a field or garden.
(v. t.) To obstruct, as a road, with a barrier; to hinder from progress or success; -- sometimes with up and out.
(v. t.) To surround for defense; to guard; to protect; to hem (in).
(v. t.) To surround so as to prevent escape.

hudge

hudge
(n.) An iron bucket for hoisting coal or ore.

judge

judge
(a.) To hear and determine, as in causes on trial; to decide as a judge; to give judgment; to pass sentence.
(a.) To assume the right to pass judgment on another; to sit in judgment or commendation; to criticise or pass adverse judgment upon others. See Judge, v. t., 3.
(v. i.) A public officer who is invested with authority to hear and determine litigated causes, and to administer justice between parties in courts held for that purpose.
(v. i.) One who has skill, knowledge, or experience, sufficient to decide on the merits of a question, or on the quality or value of anything; one who discerns properties or relations with skill and readiness; a connoisseur; an expert; a critic.
(v. i.) A person appointed to decide in a/trial of skill, speed, etc., between two or more parties; an umpire; as, a judge in a horse race.
(v. i.) One of supreme magistrates, with both civil and military powers, who governed Israel for more than four hundred years.
(v. i.) The title of the seventh book of the Old Testament; the Book of Judges.
(v. t.) To compare facts or ideas, and perceive their relations and attributes, and thus distinguish truth from falsehood; to determine; to discern; to distinguish; to form an opinion about.
(v. t.) To hear and determine by authority, as a case before a court, or a controversy between two parties.
(v. t.) To examine and pass sentence on; to try; to doom.
(v. t.) To arrogate judicial authority over; to sit in judgment upon; to be censorious toward.
(v. t.) To determine upon or deliberation; to esteem; to think; to reckon.
(v. t.) To exercise the functions of a magistrate over; to govern.

kedge

kedge
(n.) To move (a vessel) by carrying out a kedge in a boat, dropping it overboard, and hauling the vessel up to it.
(v. t.) A small anchor used whenever a large one can be dispensed witch. See Kedge, v. t., and Anchor, n.

ledge

ledge
(n.) A shelf on which articles may be laid; also, that which resembles such a shelf in form or use, as a projecting ridge or part, or a molding or edge in joinery.
(n.) A shelf, ridge, or reef, of rocks.
(n.) A layer or stratum.
(n.) A lode; a limited mass of rock bearing valuable mineral.
(n.) A piece of timber to support the deck, placed athwartship between beams.

lodge

lodge
(n.) A shelter in which one may rest; as: (a) A shed; a rude cabin; a hut; as, an Indian's lodge.
(n.) A small dwelling house, as for a gamekeeper or gatekeeper of an estate.
(n.) A den or cave.
(n.) The meeting room of an association; hence, the regularly constituted body of members which meets there; as, a masonic lodge.
(n.) The chamber of an abbot, prior, or head of a college.
(n.) The space at the mouth of a level next the shaft, widened to permit wagons to pass, or ore to be deposited for hoisting; -- called also platt.
(n.) A collection of objects lodged together.
(n.) A family of North American Indians, or the persons who usually occupy an Indian lodge, -- as a unit of enumeration, reckoned from four to six persons; as, the tribe consists of about two hundred lodges, that is, of about a thousand individuals.
(n.) To give shelter or rest to; especially, to furnish a sleeping place for; to harbor; to shelter; hence, to receive; to hold.
(n.) To drive to shelter; to track to covert.
(n.) To deposit for keeping or preservation; as, the men lodged their arms in the arsenal.
(n.) To cause to stop or rest in; to implant.
(n.) To lay down; to prostrate.
(v. i.) To rest or remain a lodge house, or other shelter; to rest; to stay; to abide; esp., to sleep at night; as, to lodge in York Street.
(v. i.) To fall or lie down, as grass or grain, when overgrown or beaten down by the wind.
(v. i.) To come to a rest; to stop and remain; as, the bullet lodged in the bark of a tree.

madge

madge
(n.) The barn owl.
(n.) The magpie.

midge

midge
(n.) Any one of many small, delicate, long-legged flies of the Chironomus, and allied genera, which do not bite. Their larvae are usually aquatic.
(n.) A very small fly, abundant in many parts of the United States and Canada, noted for the irritating quality of its bite.

nudge

nudge
(n.) A gentle push, or jog, as with the elbow.
(v. t.) To touch gently, as with the elbow, in order to call attention or convey intimation.

padge

padge
(n.) The barn owl; -- called also pudge, and pudge owl.

podge

podge
(n.) A puddle; a plash.
(n.) Porridge.

ridge

ridge
(n.) The back, or top of the back; a crest.
(n.) A range of hills or mountains, or the upper part of such a range; any extended elevation between valleys.
(n.) A raised line or strip, as of ground thrown up by a plow or left between furrows or ditches, or as on the surface of metal, cloth, or bone, etc.
(n.) The intersection of two surface forming a salient angle, especially the angle at the top between the opposite slopes or sides of a roof or a vault.
(n.) The highest portion of the glacis proceeding from the salient angle of the covered way.
(v. t.) To form a ridge of; to furnish with a ridge or ridges; to make into a ridge or ridges.
(v. t.) To form into ridges with the plow, as land.
(v. t.) To wrinkle.

sedge

sedge
(n.) Any plant of the genus Carex, perennial, endogenous herbs, often growing in dense tufts in marshy places. They have triangular jointless stems, a spiked inflorescence, and long grasslike leaves which are usually rough on the margins and midrib. There are several hundred species.
(n.) A flock of herons.

tedge

tedge
(n.) The gate of a mold, through which the melted metal is poured; runner, geat.
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