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Crossword Solutions for: ??NIC

conic

conic
(a.) Alt. of Conical
(n.) A conic section.

cynic

cynic
(a.) Alt. of Cynical
(n.) One of a sect or school of philosophers founded by Antisthenes, and of whom Diogenes was a disciple. The first Cynics were noted for austere lives and their scorn for social customs and current philosophical opinions. Hence the term Cynic symbolized, in the popular judgment, moroseness, and contempt for the views of others.
(n.) One who holds views resembling those of the Cynics; a snarler; a misanthrope; particularly, a person who believes that human conduct is directed, either consciously or unconsciously, wholly by self-interest or self-indulgence, and that appearances to the contrary are superficial and untrustworthy.

funic

funic
(a.) Funicular.

genic

genic
Of or relating to or produced by or being a gene; "genic combinations"; "genetic code"

ionic

ionic
(a.) Of or pertaining to Ionia or the Ionians.
(a.) Pertaining to the Ionic order of architecture, one of the three orders invented by the Greeks, and one of the five recognized by the Italian writers of the sixteenth century. Its distinguishing feature is a capital with spiral volutes. See Illust. of Capital.
(a.) Of or pertaining to an ion; composed of ions.
(n.) A foot consisting of four syllables: either two long and two short, -- that is, a spondee and a pyrrhic, in which case it is called the greater Ionic; or two short and two long, -- that is, a pyrrhic and a spondee, in which case it is called the smaller Ionic.
(n.) A verse or meter composed or consisting of Ionic feet.
(n.) The Ionic dialect; as, the Homeric Ionic.
(n.) Ionic type.

kinic

kinic
(a.) See Quinic.

manic

manic
Affected with or marked by frenzy or mania uncontrolled by reason; "a frenzied attack"; "a frenzied mob"; "the prosecutor's frenzied denunciation of the accused"- H.W.Carter; "outbursts of drunken violence and manic activity and creativity"

panic

panic
(a.) Extreme or sudden and causeless; unreasonable; -- said of fear or fright; as, panic fear, terror, alarm.
(a.) A sudden, overpowering fright; esp., a sudden and groundless fright; terror inspired by a trifling cause or a misapprehension of danger; as, the troops were seized with a panic; they fled in a panic.
(a.) By extension: A sudden widespread fright or apprehension concerning financial affairs.
(n.) A plant of the genus Panicum; panic grass; also, the edible grain of some species of panic grass.

pinic

pinic
(a.) Of or pertaining to the pine; obtained from the pine; formerly, designating an acid which is the chief constituent of common resin, -- now called abietic, or sylvic, acid.

punic

punic
(a.) Of or pertaining to the ancient Carthaginians.
(a.) Characteristic of the ancient Carthaginians; faithless; treacherous; as, Punic faith.

runic

runic
(a.) Of or pertaining to a rune, to runes, or to the Norsemen; as, runic verses; runic letters; runic names; runic rhyme.

sonic

sonic
Relating to audible sound; "a sonic wave"
(of speed) having or caused by speed approximately equal to that of sound in air at sea level; "a sonic boom"

tonic

tonic
(a.) Of or relating to tones or sounds; specifically (Phon.), applied to, or distingshing, a speech sound made with tone unmixed and undimmed by obstruction, such sounds, namely, the vowels and diphthongs, being so called by Dr. James Rush (1833) " from their forming the purest and most plastic material of intonation."
(a.) Of or pertaining to tension; increasing tension; hence, increasing strength; as, tonic power.
(a.) Increasing strength, or the tone of the animal system; obviating the effects of debility, and restoring healthy functions.
(n.) A tonic element or letter; a vowel or a diphthong.
(n.) The key tone, or first tone of any scale.
(n.) A medicine that increases the strength, and gives vigor of action to the system.

tunic

tunic
(n.) An under-garment worn by the ancient Romans of both sexes. It was made with or without sleeves, reached to or below the knees, and was confined at the waist by a girdle.
(n.) Any similar garment worm by ancient or Oriental peoples; also, a common name for various styles of loose-fitting under-garments and over-garments worn in modern times by Europeans and others.
(n.) Same as Tunicle.
(n.) A membrane, or layer of tissue, especially when enveloping an organ or part, as the eye.
(n.) A natural covering; an integument; as, the tunic of a seed.
(n.) See Mantle, n., 3 (a).

usnic

usnic
(a.) Pertaining to, or designating, a complex acid obtained, as a yellow crystalline substance, from certain genera of lichens (Usnea, Parmelia, etc.).

vinic

vinic
(a.) Of or pertaining to wine; as, vinic alcohol.