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Crossword Solver Solutions for: ?H?L?

ahold

ahold
(adv.) Near the wind; as, to lay a ship ahold.

ahull

ahull
(adv.) With the sails furled, and the helm lashed alee; -- applied to ships in a storm. See Hull, n.

chalk

chalk
(n.) A soft, earthy substance, of a white, grayish, or yellowish white color, consisting of calcium carbonate, and having the same composition as common limestone.
(n.) Finely prepared chalk, used as a drawing implement; also, by extension, a compound, as of clay and black lead, or the like, used in the same manner. See Crayon.
(v. t.) To rub or mark with chalk.
(v. t.) To manure with chalk, as land.
(v. t.) To make white, as with chalk; to make pale; to bleach.

chela

chela
(n.) The pincherlike claw of Crustacea and Arachnida.

child

child
(n.) A son or a daughter; a male or female descendant, in the first degree; the immediate progeny of human parents; -- in law, legitimate offspring. Used also of animals and plants.
(n.) A descendant, however remote; -- used esp. in the plural; as, the children of Israel; the children of Edom.
(n.) One who, by character of practice, shows signs of relationship to, or of the influence of, another; one closely connected with a place, occupation, character, etc.; as, a child of God; a child of the devil; a child of disobedience; a child of toil; a child of the people.
(n.) A noble youth. See Childe.
(n.) A young person of either sex. esp. one between infancy and youth; hence, one who exhibits the characteristics of a very young person, as innocence, obedience, trustfulness, limited understanding, etc.
(n.) A female infant.
(v. i.) To give birth; to produce young.

chile

chile
Very hot and finely tapering pepper of special pungency
A republic in southern South America on the western slopes of the Andes on the south Pacific coast

chili

chili
(n.) A kind of red pepper. See Capsicum

chill

chill
(a.) Moderately cold; tending to cause shivering; chilly; raw.
(a.) Affected by cold.
(a.) Characterized by coolness of manner, feeling, etc.; lacking enthusiasm or warmth; formal; distant; as, a chill reception.
(a.) Discouraging; depressing; dispiriting.
(n.) A moderate but disagreeable degree of cold; a disagreeable sensation of coolness, accompanied with shivering.
(n.) A sensation of cold with convulsive shaking of the body, pinched face, pale skin, and blue lips, caused by undue cooling of the body or by nervous excitement, or forming the precursor of some constitutional disturbance, as of a fever.
(n.) A check to enthusiasm or warmth of feeling; discouragement; as, a chill comes over an assembly.
(n.) An iron mold or portion of a mold, serving to cool rapidly, and so to harden, the surface of molten iron brought in contact with it.
(n.) The hardened part of a casting, as the tread of a car wheel.
(v. i.) To become surface-hardened by sudden cooling while solidifying; as, some kinds of cast iron chill to a greater depth than others.
(v. t.) To strike with a chill; to make chilly; to cause to shiver; to affect with cold.
(v. t.) To check enthusiasm or warmth of feeling of; to depress; to discourage.
(v. t.) To produce, by sudden cooling, a change of crystallization at or near the surface of, so as to increase the hardness; said of cast iron.

choli

choli
A short-sleeved bodice, as worn by Indian women.

chyle

chyle
(n.) A milky fluid containing the fatty matter of the food in a state of emulsion, or fine mechanical division; formed from chyme by the action of the intestinal juices. It is absorbed by the lacteals, and conveyed into the blood by the thoracic duct.

dhole

dhole
(n.) A fierce, wild dog (Canis Dukhunensis), found in the mountains of India. It is remarkable for its propensity to hunt the tiger and other wild animals in packs.

ghole

ghole
(n.) See Ghoul.

ghyll

ghyll
(n.) A ravine. See Gill a woody glen.

phyla

phyla
(pl.) of Phylon
(pl.) of Phylum

phyle

phyle
(n.) A local division of the people in ancient Athens; a clan; a tribe.

shale

shale
(n.) A shell or husk; a cod or pod.
(n.) A fine-grained sedimentary rock of a thin, laminated, and often friable, structure.
(v. t.) To take off the shell or coat of; to shell.

shall

shall
(v. i. & auxiliary.) To owe; to be under obligation for.
(v. i. & auxiliary.) To be obliged; must.
(v. i. & auxiliary.) As an auxiliary, shall indicates a duty or necessity whose obligation is derived from the person speaking; as, you shall go; he shall go; that is, I order or promise your going. It thus ordinarily expresses, in the second and third persons, a command, a threat, or a promise. If the auxillary be emphasized, the command is made more imperative, the promise or that more positive and sure. It is also employed in the language of prophecy; as, "the day shall come when . . . , " since a promise or threat and an authoritative prophecy nearly coincide in significance. In shall with the first person, the necessity of the action is sometimes implied as residing elsewhere than in the speaker; as, I shall suffer; we shall see; and there is always a less distinct and positive assertion of his volition than is indicated by will. "I shall go" implies nearly a simple futurity; more exactly, a foretelling or an expectation of my going, in which, naturally enough, a certain degree of plan or intention may be included; emphasize the shall, and the event is described as certain to occur, and the expression approximates in meaning to our emphatic "I will go." In a question, the relation of speaker and source of obligation is of course transferred to the person addressed; as, "Shall you go?" (answer, "I shall go"); "Shall he go?" i. e., "Do you require or promise his going?" (answer, "He shall go".) The same relation is transferred to either second or third person in such phrases as "You say, or think, you shall go;" "He says, or thinks, he shall go." After a conditional conjunction (as if, whether) shall is used in all persons to express futurity simply; as, if I, you, or he shall say they are right. Should is everywhere used in the same connection and the same senses as shall, as its imperfect. It also expresses duty or moral obligation; as, he should do it whether he will or not. In the early English, and hence in our English Bible, shall is the auxiliary mainly used, in all the persons, to express simple futurity. (Cf. Will, v. t.) Shall may be used elliptically; thus, with an adverb or other word expressive of motion go may be omitted.

shaly

shaly
(a.) Resembling shale in structure.

sheld

sheld
(a.) Variegated; spotted; speckled; piebald.

shelf

shelf
(v. i.) A flat tablet or ledge of any material set horizontally at a distance from the floor, to hold objects of use or ornament.
(v. i.) A sand bank in the sea, or a rock, or ledge of rocks, rendering the water shallow, and dangerous to ships.
(v. i.) A stratum lying in a very even manner; a flat, projecting layer of rock.
(v. i.) A piece of timber running the whole length of a vessel inside the timberheads.
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