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Crossword Solutions for: ?O?M

boom

boom
(n.) A long pole or spar, run out for the purpose of extending the bottom of a particular sail; as, the jib boom, the studding-sail boom, etc.
(n.) A long spar or beam, projecting from the mast of a derrick, from the outer end of which the body to be lifted is suspended.
(n.) A pole with a conspicuous top, set up to mark the channel in a river or harbor.
(n.) A strong chain cable, or line of spars bound together, extended across a river or the mouth of a harbor, to obstruct navigation or passage.
(n.) A line of connected floating timbers stretched across a river, or inclosing an area of water, to keep saw logs, etc., from floating away.
(n.) A hollow roar, as of waves or cannon; also, the hollow cry of the bittern; a booming.
(n.) A strong and extensive advance, with more or less noisy excitement; -- applied colloquially or humorously to market prices, the demand for stocks or commodities and to political chances of aspirants to office; as, a boom in the stock market; a boom in coffee.
(v. i.) To cry with a hollow note; to make a hollow sound, as the bittern, and some insects.
(v. i.) To make a hollow sound, as of waves or cannon.
(v. i.) To rush with violence and noise, as a ship under a press of sail, before a free wind.
(v. i.) To have a rapid growth in market value or in popular favor; to go on rushingly.
(v. t.) To extend, or push, with a boom or pole; as, to boom out a sail; to boom off a boat.
(v. t.) To cause to advance rapidly in price; as, to boom railroad or mining shares; to create a "boom" for; as to boom Mr. C. for senator.

coom

coom
(n.) Soot; coal dust; refuse matter, as the dirty grease which comes from axle boxes, or the refuse at the mouth of an oven.

corm

corm
(n.) A solid bulb-shaped root, as of the crocus. See Bulb.
(n.) Same as Cormus, 2.

doom

doom
(v. t.) Judgment; judicial sentence; penal decree; condemnation.
(v. t.) That to which one is doomed or sentenced; destiny or fate, esp. unhappy destiny; penalty.
(v. t.) Ruin; death.
(v. t.) Discriminating opinion or judgment; discrimination; discernment; decision.
(v. t.) To judge; to estimate or determine as a judge.
(v. t.) To pronounce sentence or judgment on; to condemn; to consign by a decree or sentence; to sentence; as, a criminal doomed to chains or death.
(v. t.) To ordain as penalty; hence, to mulct or fine.
(v. t.) To assess a tax upon, by estimate or at discretion.
(v. t.) To destine; to fix irrevocably the destiny or fate of; to appoint, as by decree or by fate.

dorm

dorm
A college or university building containing living quarters for students

foam

foam
(n.) The white substance, consisting of an aggregation of bubbles, which is formed on the surface of liquids, or in the mouth of an animal, by violent agitation or fermentation; froth; spume; scum; as, the foam of the sea.
(n.) To gather foam; to froth; as, the billows foam.
(n.) To form foam, or become filled with foam; -- said of a steam boiler when the water is unduly agitated and frothy, as because of chemical action.
(v.t.) To cause to foam; as,to foam the goblet; also (with out), to throw out with rage or violence, as foam.

form

form
(n.) A suffix used to denote in the form / shape of, resembling, etc.; as, valiform; oviform.
(n.) The shape and structure of anything, as distinguished from the material of which it is composed; particular disposition or arrangement of matter, giving it individuality or distinctive character; configuration; figure; external appearance.
(n.) Constitution; mode of construction, organization, etc.; system; as, a republican form of government.
(n.) Established method of expression or practice; fixed way of proceeding; conventional or stated scheme; formula; as, a form of prayer.
(n.) Show without substance; empty, outside appearance; vain, trivial, or conventional ceremony; conventionality; formality; as, a matter of mere form.
(n.) Orderly arrangement; shapeliness; also, comeliness; elegance; beauty.
(n.) A shape; an image; a phantom.
(n.) That by which shape is given or determined; mold; pattern; model.
(n.) A long seat; a bench; hence, a rank of students in a school; a class; also, a class or rank in society.
(n.) The seat or bed of a hare.
(n.) The type or other matter from which an impression is to be taken, arranged and secured in a chase.
(n.) The boundary line of a material object. In painting, more generally, the human body.
(n.) The particular shape or structure of a word or part of speech; as, participial forms; verbal forms.
(n.) The combination of planes included under a general crystallographic symbol. It is not necessarily a closed solid.
(n.) That assemblage or disposition of qualities which makes a conception, or that internal constitution which makes an existing thing to be what it is; -- called essential or substantial form, and contradistinguished from matter; hence, active or formative nature; law of being or activity; subjectively viewed, an idea; objectively, a law.
(n.) Mode of acting or manifestation to the senses, or the intellect; as, water assumes the form of ice or snow. In modern usage, the elements of a conception furnished by the mind's own activity, as contrasted with its object or condition, which is called the matter; subjectively, a mode of apprehension or belief conceived as dependent on the constitution of the mind; objectively, universal and necessary accompaniments or elements of every object known or thought of.
(n.) The peculiar characteristics of an organism as a type of others; also, the structure of the parts of an animal or plant.
(n.) To give form or shape to; to frame; to construct; to make; to fashion.
(n.) To give a particular shape to; to shape, mold, or fashion into a certain state or condition; to arrange; to adjust; also, to model by instruction and discipline; to mold by influence, etc.; to train.
(n.) To go to make up; to act as constituent of; to be the essential or constitutive elements of; to answer for; to make the shape of; -- said of that out of which anything is formed or constituted, in whole or in part.
(n.) To provide with a form, as a hare. See Form, n., 9.
(n.) To derive by grammatical rules, as by adding the proper suffixes and affixes.
(v. i.) To take a form, definite shape, or arrangement; as, the infantry should form in column.
(v. i.) To run to a form, as a hare.

gorm

gorm
(n.) Axle grease. See Gome.
(v. t.) To daub, as the hands or clothing, with gorm; to daub with anything sticky.

holm

holm
(n.) A common evergreen oak, of Europe (Quercus Ilex); -- called also ilex, and holly.
(n.) An islet in a river.
(n.) Low, flat land.

loam

loam
(n.) A kind of soil; an earthy mixture of clay and sand, with organic matter to which its fertility is chiefly due.
(n.) A mixture of sand, clay, and other materials, used in making molds for large castings, often without a pattern.
(v. i.) To cover, smear, or fill with loam.

loom

loom
(n.) See Loon, the bird.
(n.) A frame or machine of wood or other material, in which a weaver forms cloth out of thread; a machine for interweaving yarn or threads into a fabric, as in knitting or lace making.
(n.) That part of an oar which is near the grip or handle and inboard from the rowlock.
(n.) The state of looming; esp., an unnatural and indistinct appearance of elevation or enlargement of anything, as of land or of a ship, seen by one at sea.
(v. i.) To appear above the surface either of sea or land, or to appear enlarged, or distorted and indistinct, as a distant object, a ship at sea, or a mountain, esp. from atmospheric influences; as, the ship looms large; the land looms high.
(v. i.) To rise and to be eminent; to be elevated or ennobled, in a moral sense.

norm

norm
(a.) A rule or authoritative standard; a model; a type.
(a.) A typical, structural unit; a type.

poem

poem
(n.) A metrical composition; a composition in verse written in certain measures, whether in blank verse or in rhyme, and characterized by imagination and poetic diction; -- contradistinguished from prose; as, the poems of Homer or of Milton.
(n.) A composition, not in verse, of which the language is highly imaginative or impassioned; as, a prose poem; the poems of Ossian.

roam

roam
(n.) The act of roaming; a wandering; a ramble; as, he began his roam o'er hill amd dale.
(v. i.) To go from place to place without any certain purpose or direction; to rove; to wander.
(v. t.) To range or wander over.

room

room
(a.) Spacious; roomy.
(n.) Unobstructed spase; space which may be occupied by or devoted to any object; compass; extent of place, great or small; as, there is not room for a house; the table takes up too much room.
(n.) A particular portion of space appropriated for occupancy; a place to sit, stand, or lie; a seat.
(n.) Especially, space in a building or ship inclosed or set apart by a partition; an apartment or chamber.
(n.) Place or position in society; office; rank; post; station; also, a place or station once belonging to, or occupied by, another, and vacated.
(n.) Possibility of admission; ability to admit; opportunity to act; fit occasion; as, to leave room for hope.
(v. i.) To occupy a room or rooms; to lodge; as, they arranged to room together.

soam

soam
(n.) A chain by which a leading horse draws a plow.

worm

worm
(n.) A creeping or a crawling animal of any kind or size, as a serpent, caterpillar, snail, or the like.
(n.) Any small creeping animal or reptile, either entirely without feet, or with very short ones, including a great variety of animals; as, an earthworm; the blindworm.
(n.) Any helminth; an entozoon.
(n.) Any annelid.
(n.) An insect larva.
(n.) Same as Vermes.
(n.) An internal tormentor; something that gnaws or afflicts one's mind with remorse.
(n.) A being debased and despised.
(n.) Anything spiral, vermiculated, or resembling a worm
(n.) The thread of a screw.
(n.) A spiral instrument or screw, often like a double corkscrew, used for drawing balls from firearms.
(n.) A certain muscular band in the tongue of some animals, as the dog; the lytta. See Lytta.
(n.) The condensing tube of a still, often curved and wound to economize space. See Illust. of Still.
(n.) A short revolving screw, the threads of which drive, or are driven by, a worm wheel by gearing into its teeth or cogs. See Illust. of Worm gearing, below.
(n.) To cut the worm, or lytta, from under the tongue of, as a dog, for the purpose of checking a disposition to gnaw. The operation was formerly supposed to guard against canine madness.
(n.) To wind rope, yarn, or other material, spirally round, between the strands of, as a cable; to wind with spun yarn, as a small rope.
(v. i.) To work slowly, gradually, and secretly.
(v. t.) To effect, remove, drive, draw, or the like, by slow and secret means; -- often followed by out.
(v. t.) To clean by means of a worm; to draw a wad or cartridge from, as a firearm. See Worm, n. 5 (b).

zoom

zoom
The act of rising upward into the air
A rapid rise
Rise rapidly; "the dollar soared against the yen"
Move along very quickly
Move with a low humming noise