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Crossword Solver Answers for: ?OR?E??

borders

borders
A strip forming the outer edge of something; "the rug had a wide blue border"
A decorative recessed or relieved surface on an edge
A line that indicates a boundary
The boundary of a surface
The boundary line or the area immediately inside the boundary
Lie adjacent to another or share a boundary; "Canada adjoins the U.S."; "England marches with Scotland"
Extend on all sides of simultaneously; encircle; "The forest surrounds my property"
Enclose in or as if in a frame; "frame a picture"
Provide with a border or edge; "edge the tablecloth with embroidery"
Form the boundary of; be contiguous to

bornean

bornean
A native or inhabitant of Borneo

borneol

borneol
(n.) A rare variety of camphor, C10H17.OH, resembling ordinary camphor, from which it can be produced by reduction. It is said to occur in the camphor tree of Borneo and Sumatra (Dryobalanops camphora), but the natural borneol is rarely found in European or American commerce, being in great request by the Chinese. Called also Borneo camphor, Malay camphor, and camphol.

corbell

corbell
(n.) A sculptured basket of flowers; a corbel.
(n.) Small gabions.

corbels

corbels
Furnish with a corbel
(architecture) a triangular bracket of brick or stone (usually of slight extent)

corkers

corkers
A machine that is used to put corks in bottles
(dated slang) a remarkable or excellent thing or person; "that story was a corker"

corneal

corneal
(a.) Pertaining to the cornea.

cornell

cornell
United States businessman who unified the telegraph system in the United States and who in 1865 (with Andrew D. White) founded Cornell University (1807-1874)
United States actress noted for her performances in Broadway plays (1893-1974)

cornels

cornels
A tree of shrub of the genus Cornus often having showy bracts resembling flowers

corners

corners
The point where two lines meet or intersect; "the corners of a rectangle"
A place off to the side of an area; "he tripled to the rightfield corner"; "the southeastern corner of the Mediterranean"
A remote area; "in many corners of the world they still practice slavery"
The point where three areas or surfaces meet or intersect; "the corners of a cube"
A projecting part where two sides or edges meet; "he knocked off the corners"
A small concavity
A predicament from which a skillful or graceful escape is impossible; "his lying got him into a tight corner"
A temporary monopoly on a kind of commercial trade; "a corner on the silver market"
Turn a corner; "the car corners"
Force a person or an animal into a position from which he cannot escape
Gain control over; "corner the gold market"
The intersection of two streets; "standing on the corner watching all the girls go by"
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cornets

cornets
A brass musical instrument with a brilliant tone; has a narrow tube and a flared bell and is played by means of valves
2. Standard-bearer at the riding of the marches (boundaries) of a burgh (e.g. in the Scottish Borders).

correct

correct
(a.) Set right, or made straight; hence, conformable to truth, rectitude, or propriety, or to a just standard; not faulty or imperfect; free from error; as, correct behavior; correct views.
(v. t.) To make right; to bring to the standard of truth, justice, or propriety; to rectify; as, to correct manners or principles.
(v. t.) To remove or retrench the faults or errors of; to amend; to set right; as, to correct the proof (that is, to mark upon the margin the changes to be made, or to make in the type the changes so marked).
(v. t.) To bring back, or attempt to bring back, to propriety in morals; to reprove or punish for faults or deviations from moral rectitude; to chastise; to discipline; as, a child should be corrected for lying.
(v. t.) To counteract the qualities of one thing by those of another; -- said of whatever is wrong or injurious; as, to correct the acidity of the stomach by alkaline preparations.

cortege

cortege
(n.) A train of attendants; a procession.

corvees

corvees
Unpaid labor (as for the maintenance of roads) required by a lord of his vassals in lieu of taxes

dormers

dormers
A gabled extension built out from a sloping roof to accommodate a vertical window

forbear

forbear
(n.) An ancestor; a forefather; -- usually in the plural.
(v. i.) To refrain from proceeding; to pause; to delay.
(v. i.) To refuse; to decline; to give no heed.
(v. i.) To control one's self when provoked.
(v. t.) To keep away from; to avoid; to abstain from; to give up; as, to forbear the use of a word of doubdtful propriety.
(v. t.) To treat with consideration or indulgence.
(v. t.) To cease from bearing.

forceps

forceps
(n.) A pair of pinchers, or tongs; an instrument for grasping, holding firmly, or exerting traction upon, bodies which it would be inconvenient or impracticable to seize with the fingers, especially one for delicate operations, as those of watchmakers, surgeons, accoucheurs, dentists, etc.
(n.) The caudal forceps-shaped appendage of earwigs and some other insects. See Earwig.

forfeit

forfeit
(n.) Injury; wrong; mischief.
(n.) A thing forfeit or forfeited; what is or may be taken from one in requital of a misdeed committed; that which is lost, or the right to which is alienated, by a crime, offense, neglect of duty, or breach of contract; hence, a fine; a mulct; a penalty; as, he who murders pays the forfeit of his life.
(n.) Something deposited and redeemable by a sportive fine; -- whence the game of forfeits.
(n.) Lost or alienated for an offense or crime; liable to penal seizure.
(n.) To lose, or lose the right to, by some error, fault, offense, or crime; to render one's self by misdeed liable to be deprived of; to alienate the right to possess, by some neglect or crime; as, to forfeit an estate by treason; to forfeit reputation by a breach of promise; -- with to before the one acquiring what is forfeited.
(p. p. / a.) In the condition of being forfeited; subject to alienation.
(v. i.) To be guilty of a misdeed; to be criminal; to transgress.
(v. i.) To fail to keep an obligation.

forfend

forfend
(v. t.) To prohibit; to forbid; to avert.

forfete

forfete
(v. i.) To incur a penalty; to transgress.

forgers

forgers
Someone who makes copies illegally
Someone who operates a forge
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