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Crossword Answers for: ?T???T?

ataunto

ataunto
(adv.) Fully rigged, as a vessel; with all sails set; set on end or set right.

athlete

athlete
(n.) One who contended for a prize in the public games of ancient Greece or Rome.
(n.) Any one trained to contend in exercises requiring great physical agility and strength; one who has great activity and strength; a champion.
(n.) One fitted for, or skilled in, intellectual contests; as, athletes of debate.

atlanta

atlanta
(n.) A genus of small glassy heteropod mollusks found swimming at the surface in mid ocean. See Heteropod.

attaste

attaste
(v. t.) To taste or cause to taste.

attests

attests
Authenticate, affirm to be true, genuine, or correct, as in an official capacity; "I attest this signature"
Establish or verify the usage of; "This word is not attested until 1993"
Provide evidence for; stand as proof of; show by one's behavior, attitude, or external attributes;
Give testimony in a court of law

attrite

attrite
(a.) Rubbed; worn by friction.
(a.) Repentant from fear of punishment; having attrition of grief for sin; -- opposed to contrite.

iterate

iterate
(a.) Uttered or done again; repeated.
(adv.) By way of iteration.
(v. t.) To utter or do a second time or many times; to repeat; as, to iterate advice.

otolite

otolite
(n.) One of the small bones or particles of calcareous or other hard substance in the internal ear of vertebrates, and in the auditory organs of many invertebrates; an ear stone. Collectively, the otoliths are called ear sand and otoconite.

statute

statute
(a.) An act of a corporation or of its founder, intended as a permanent rule or law; as, the statutes of a university.
(a.) An assemblage of farming servants (held possibly by statute) for the purpose of being hired; -- called also statute fair.
(n.) An act of the legislature of a state or country, declaring, commanding, or prohibiting something; a positive law; the written will of the legislature expressed with all the requisite forms of legislation; -- used in distinction fraom common law. See Common law, under Common, a.

stealth

stealth
(v. t.) The act of stealing; theft.
(v. t.) The thing stolen; stolen property.
(v. t.) The bringing to pass anything in a secret or concealed manner; a secret procedure; a clandestine practice or action; -- in either a good or a bad sense.

streets

streets
A thoroughfare (usually including sidewalks) that is lined with buildings; "they walked the streets of the small town"; "he lives on Nassau Street"
The part of a thoroughfare between the sidewalks; the part of the thoroughfare on which vehicles travel; "be careful crossing the street"
People living or working on the same street; "the whole street protested the absence of street lights"
A situation offering opportunities; "he worked both sides of the street"; "cooperation is a two-way street"
The streets of a city viewed as a depressed environment in which there is poverty and crime and prostitution and dereliction; "she tried to keep her children off the street"

stretto

stretto
(n.) The crowding of answer upon subject near the end of a fugue.
(n.) In an opera or oratorio, a coda, or winding up, in an accelerated time.

strewth

strewth
Also (struth) exclamation British informal used to express surprise or dismay.

stylets

stylets
Small needlelike appendage; especially the feeding organ of a tardigrade

stylite

stylite
(n.) One of a sect of anchorites in the early church, who lived on the tops of pillars for the exercise of their patience; -- called also pillarist and pillar saint.

utility

utility
(n.) The quality or state of being useful; usefulness; production of good; profitableness to some valuable end; as, the utility of manure upon land; the utility of the sciences; the utility of medicines.
(n.) Adaptation to satisfy the desires or wants; intrinsic value. See Note under Value, 2.
(n.) Happiness; the greatest good, or happiness, of the greatest number, -- the foundation of utilitarianism.