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Crossword Puzzle Solutions for: ?Y?E

ayle

ayle
(n.) A grandfather.

ayme

ayme
(n.) The utterance of the ejaculation "Ay me !" [Obs.] See Ay, interj.

byre

byre
(n.) A cow house.

byte

byte
A sequence of 8 bits (enough to represent one character of alphanumeric data) processed as a single unit of information

cyme

cyme
(n.) A flattish or convex flower cluster, of the centrifugal or determinate type, differing from a corymb chiefly in the order of the opening of the blossoms.

dyke

dyke
(n.) See Dike. The spelling dyke is restricted by some to the geological meaning.

dyne

dyne
(n.) The unit of force, in the C. G. S. (Centimeter Gram Second) system of physical units; that is, the force which, acting on a gram for a second, generates a velocity of a centimeter per second.

eyle

eyle
(v. t. & i.) To ail.

eyre

eyre
(n.) A journey in circuit of certain judges called justices in eyre (or in itinere).

fyke

fyke
(n.) A long bag net distended by hoops, into which fish can pass easily, without being able to return; -- called also fyke net.

gybe

gybe
(n.) See Jib.
(n. & v.) See Gibe.
(v. t. & i.) To shift from one side of a vessel to the other; -- said of the boom of a fore-and-aft sail when the vessel is steered off the wind until the sail fills on the opposite side.

gyle

gyle
(n.) Fermented wort used for making vinegar.

gyre

gyre
(n.) A circular motion, or a circle described by a moving body; a turn or revolution; a circuit.
(v. t. & i.) To turn round; to gyrate.

gyte

gyte
(a.) Delirious; senselessly extravagant; as, the man is clean gyte.

gyve

gyve
(n.) A shackle; especially, one to confine the legs; a fetter.
(v. t.) To fetter; to shackle; to chain. H () the eighth letter of the English alphabet, is classed among the consonants, and is formed with the mouth organs in the same position as that of the succeeding vowel. It is used with certain consonants to form digraphs representing sounds which are not found in the alphabet, as sh, th, /, as in shall, thing, /ine (for zh see /274); also, to modify the sounds of some other letters, as when placed after c and p, with the former of which it represents a compound sound like that of tsh, as in charm (written also tch as in catch), with the latter, the sound of f, as in phase, phantom. In some words, mostly derived or introduced from foreign languages, h following c and g indicates that those consonants have the hard sound before e, i, and y, as in chemistry, chiromancy, chyle, Ghent, Ghibelline, etc.; in some others, ch has the sound of sh, as in chicane. See Guide to Pronunciation, // 153, 179, 181-3, 237-8.

hyde

hyde
The evil personality of the protagonist in The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde by R. L. Stevenson

hyke

hyke
(n.) See Haik, and Huke.

hyne

hyne
(n.) A servant. See Hine.

hype

hype
Publicize in an exaggerated and often misleading manner
Blatant or sensational promotion

kyke

kyke
(v. i.) To look steadfastly; to gaze.

kyle

kyle
A Scottish word for a narrow sea channel
Scottish word for narrow sea channel
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