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Crossword Solver Solutions for: C?A?E

cease

cease
(n.) Extinction.
(v. i.) To come to an end; to stop; to leave off or give over; to desist; as, the noise ceased.
(v. i.) To be wanting; to fail; to pass away.
(v. t.) To put a stop to; to bring to an end.

chace

chace
(n.) See 3d Chase, n., 3.
(v. t.) To pursue. See Chase v. t.

chafe

chafe
(n.) Heat excited by friction.
(n.) Injury or wear caused by friction.
(n.) Vexation; irritation of mind; rage.
(v. i.) To rub; to come together so as to wear by rubbing; to wear by friction.
(v. i.) To be worn by rubbing; as, a cable chafes.
(v. i.) To have a feeling of vexation; to be vexed; to fret; to be irritated.
(v. t.) To excite heat in by friction; to rub in order to stimulate and make warm.
(v. t.) To excite passion or anger in; to fret; to irritate.
(v. t.) To fret and wear by rubbing; as, to chafe a cable.

chape

chape
(n.) The piece by which an object is attached to something, as the frog of a scabbard or the metal loop at the back of a buckle by which it is fastened to a strap.
(n.) The transverse guard of a sword or dagger.
(n.) The metal plate or tip which protects the end of a scabbard, belt, etc.

chare

chare
(n.) A narrow street.
(n. & v.) A chore; to chore; to do. See Char.
(v. i.) To work by the day, without being a regularly hired servant; to do small jobs.
(v. t.) To perform; to do; to finish.
(v. t.) To work or hew, as stone.

chase

chase
(n.) A rectangular iron frame in which pages or columns of type are imposed.
(n.) The part of a cannon from the reenforce or the trunnions to the swell of the muzzle. See Cannon.
(n.) A groove, or channel, as in the face of a wall; a trench, as for the reception of drain tile.
(n.) A kind of joint by which an overlap joint is changed to a flush joint, by means of a gradually deepening rabbet, as at the ends of clinker-built boats.
(v.) Vehement pursuit for the purpose of killing or capturing, as of an enemy, or game; an earnest seeking after any object greatly desired; the act or habit of hunting; a hunt.
(v.) That which is pursued or hunted.
(v.) An open hunting ground to which game resorts, and which is private properly, thus differing from a forest, which is not private property, and from a park, which is inclosed. Sometimes written chace.
(v.) A division of the floor of a gallery, marked by a figure or otherwise; the spot where a ball falls, and between which and the dedans the adversary must drive his ball in order to gain a point.
(v. i.) To give chase; to hunt; as, to chase around after a doctor.
(v. t.) To pursue for the purpose of killing or taking, as an enemy, or game; to hunt.
(v. t.) To follow as if to catch; to pursue; to compel to move on; to drive by following; to cause to fly; -- often with away or off; as, to chase the hens away.
(v. t.) To pursue eagerly, as hunters pursue game.
(v. t.) To ornament (a surface of metal) by embossing, cutting away parts, and the like.
(v. t.) To cut, so as to make a screw thread.

clake

clake
(n.) Alt. of Claik

crake

crake
(n.) A boast. See Crack, n.
(n.) Any species or rail of the genera Crex and Porzana; -- so called from its singular cry. See Corncrake.
(v. t. & i.) To cry out harshly and loudly, like the bird called crake.
(v. t. & i.) To boast; to speak loudly and boastfully.

crane

crane
(n.) A measure for fresh herrings, -- as many as will fill a barrel.
(n.) A wading bird of the genus Grus, and allied genera, of various species, having a long, straight bill, and long legs and neck.
(n.) A machine for raising and lowering heavy weights, and, while holding them suspended, transporting them through a limited lateral distance. In one form it consists of a projecting arm or jib of timber or iron, a rotating post or base, and the necessary tackle, windlass, etc.; -- so called from a fancied similarity between its arm and the neck of a crane See Illust. of Derrick.
(n.) An iron arm with horizontal motion, attached to the side or back of a fireplace, for supporting kettles, etc., over a fire.
(n.) A siphon, or bent pipe, for drawing liquors out of a cask.
(n.) A forked post or projecting bracket to support spars, etc., -- generally used in pairs. See Crotch, 2.
(v. i.) to reach forward with head and neck, in order to see better; as, a hunter cranes forward before taking a leap.
(v. t.) To cause to rise; to raise or lift, as by a crane; -- with up.
(v. t.) To stretch, as a crane stretches its neck; as, to crane the neck disdainfully.

crape

crape
(n.) A thin, crimped stuff, made of raw silk gummed and twisted on the mill. Black crape is much used for mourning garments, also for the dress of some clergymen.
(n.) To form into ringlets; to curl; to crimp; to friz; as, to crape the hair; to crape silk.

crate

crate
(n.) A large basket or hamper of wickerwork, used for the transportation of china, crockery, and similar wares.
(n.) A box or case whose sides are of wooden slats with interspaces, -- used especially for transporting fruit.
(v. t.) To pack in a crate or case for transportation; as, to crate a sewing machine; to crate peaches.

crave

crave
(v. i.) To desire strongly; to feel an insatiable longing; as, a craving appetite.
(v. t.) To ask with earnestness or importunity; to ask with submission or humility; to beg; to entreat; to beseech; to implore.
(v. t.) To call for, as a gratification; to long for; hence, to require or demand; as, the stomach craves food.

craze

craze
(n.) Craziness; insanity.
(n.) A strong habitual desire or fancy; a crotchet.
(n.) A temporary passion or infatuation, as for same new amusement, pursuit, or fashion; as, the bric-a-brac craze; the aesthetic craze.
(v. i.) To be crazed, or to act or appear as one that is crazed; to rave; to become insane.
(v. i.) To crack, as the glazing of porcelain or pottery.
(v. t.) To break into pieces; to crush; to grind to powder. See Crase.
(v. t.) To weaken; to impair; to render decrepit.
(v. t.) To derange the intellect of; to render insane.