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Crossword Solver Solutions for: C?EE?

cheek

cheek
(n.) The side of the face below the eye.
(n.) The cheek bone.
(n.) Those pieces of a machine, or of any timber, or stone work, which form corresponding sides, or which are similar and in pair; as, the cheeks (jaws) of a vise; the cheeks of a gun carriage, etc.
(n.) The branches of a bridle bit.
(n.) A section of a flask, so made that it can be moved laterally, to permit the removal of the pattern from the mold; the middle part of a flask.
(n.) Cool confidence; assurance; impudence.
(v. t.) To be impudent or saucy to.

cheep

cheep
(n.) A chirp, peep, or squeak, as of a young bird or mouse.
(v. i.) To chirp, as a young bird.
(v. t.) To give expression to in a chirping tone.

cheer

cheer
(n.) The face; the countenance or its expression.
(n.) Feeling; spirit; state of mind or heart.
(n.) Gayety; mirth; cheerfulness; animation.
(n.) That which promotes good spirits or cheerfulness; provisions prepared for a feast; entertainment; as, a table loaded with good cheer.
(n.) A shout, hurrah, or acclamation, expressing joy enthusiasm, applause, favor, etc.
(v. i.) To grow cheerful; to become gladsome or joyous; -- usually with up.
(v. i.) To be in any state or temper of mind.
(v. i.) To utter a shout or shouts of applause, triumph, etc.
(v. t.) To cause to rejoice; to gladden; to make cheerful; -- often with up.
(v. t.) To infuse life, courage, animation, or hope, into; to inspirit; to solace or comfort.
(v. t.) To salute or applaud with cheers; to urge on by cheers; as, to cheer hounds in a chase.

creed

creed
(v. t.) A definite summary of what is believed; esp., a summary of the articles of Christian faith; a confession of faith for public use; esp., one which is brief and comprehensive.
(v. t.) Any summary of principles or opinions professed or adhered to.
(v. t.) To believe; to credit.

creek

creek
(n.) A small inlet or bay, narrower and extending further into the land than a cove; a recess in the shore of the sea, or of a river.
(n.) A stream of water smaller than a river and larger than a brook.
(n.) Any turn or winding.

creel

creel
(n.) An osier basket, such as anglers use.
(n.) A bar or set of bars with skewers for holding paying-off bobbins, as in the roving machine, throstle, and mule.

creep

creep
(n.) The act or process of creeping.
(n.) A distressing sensation, or sound, like that occasioned by the creeping of insects.
(n.) A slow rising of the floor of a gallery, occasioned by the pressure of incumbent strata upon the pillars or sides; a gradual movement of mining ground.
(v. i.) To drag in deep water with creepers, as for recovering a submarine cable.
(v. t.) To move along the ground, or on any other surface, on the belly, as a worm or reptile; to move as a child on the hands and knees; to crawl.
(v. t.) To move slowly, feebly, or timorously, as from unwillingness, fear, or weakness.
(v. t.) To move in a stealthy or secret manner; to move imperceptibly or clandestinely; to steal in; to insinuate itself or one's self; as, age creeps upon us.
(v. t.) To slip, or to become slightly displaced; as, the collodion on a negative, or a coat of varnish, may creep in drying; the quicksilver on a mirror may creep.
(v. t.) To move or behave with servility or exaggerated humility; to fawn; as, a creeping sycophant.
(v. t.) To grow, as a vine, clinging to the ground or to some other support by means of roots or rootlets, or by tendrils, along its length.
(v. t.) To have a sensation as of insects creeping on the skin of the body; to crawl; as, the sight made my flesh creep. See Crawl, v. i., 4.

crees

crees
(n. pl.) An Algonquin tribe of Indians, inhabiting a large part of British America east of the Rocky Mountains and south of Hudson's Bay.