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Crossword Solver Solutions for: F?O??

feoff

feoff
(n.) A fief. See Fief.
(v. t.) To invest with a fee or feud; to give or grant a corporeal hereditament to; to enfeoff.

fiord

fiord
(n.) A narrow inlet of the sea, penetrating between high banks or rocks, as on the coasts of Norway and Alaska.

fjord

fjord
(n.) See Fiord.

float

float
(n.) To rest on the surface of any fluid; to swim; to be buoyed up.
(n.) To move quietly or gently on the water, as a raft; to drift along; to move or glide without effort or impulse on the surface of a fluid, or through the air.
(v. i.) Anything which floats or rests on the surface of a fluid, as to sustain weight, or to indicate the height of the surface, or mark the place of, something.
(v. i.) A mass of timber or boards fastened together, and conveyed down a stream by the current; a raft.
(v. i.) The hollow, metallic ball of a self-acting faucet, which floats upon the water in a cistern or boiler.
(v. i.) The cork or quill used in angling, to support the bait line, and indicate the bite of a fish.
(v. i.) Anything used to buoy up whatever is liable to sink; an inflated bag or pillow used by persons learning to swim; a life preserver.
(v. i.) A float board. See Float board (below).
(v. i.) A contrivance for affording a copious stream of water to the heated surface of an object of large bulk, as an anvil or die.
(v. i.) The act of flowing; flux; flow.
(v. i.) A quantity of earth, eighteen feet square and one foot deep.
(v. i.) The trowel or tool with which the floated coat of plastering is leveled and smoothed.
(v. i.) A polishing block used in marble working; a runner.
(v. i.) A single-cut file for smoothing; a tool used by shoemakers for rasping off pegs inside a shoe.
(v. i.) A coal cart.
(v. i.) The sea; a wave. See Flote, n.
(v. t.) To cause to float; to cause to rest or move on the surface of a fluid; as, the tide floated the ship into the harbor.
(v. t.) To flood; to overflow; to cover with water.
(v. t.) To pass over and level the surface of with a float while the plastering is kept wet.
(v. t.) To support and sustain the credit of, as a commercial scheme or a joint-stock company, so as to enable it to go into, or continue in, operation.

flock

flock
(n.) A company or collection of living creatures; -- especially applied to sheep and birds, rarely to persons or (except in the plural) to cattle and other large animals; as, a flock of ravenous fowl.
(n.) A Christian church or congregation; considered in their relation to the pastor, or minister in charge.
(n.) A lock of wool or hair.
(n.) Woolen or cotton refuse (sing. / pl.), old rags, etc., reduced to a degree of fineness by machinery, and used for stuffing unpholstered furniture.
(sing. / pl.) Very fine, sifted, woolen refuse, especially that from shearing the nap of cloths, used as a coating for wall paper to give it a velvety or clothlike appearance; also, the dust of vegetable fiber used for a similar purpose.
(v. i.) To gather in companies or crowds.
(v. t.) To flock to; to crowd.
(v. t.) To coat with flock, as wall paper; to roughen the surface of (as glass) so as to give an appearance of being covered with fine flock.

flocs

flocs
A small loosely aggregated mass of flocculent material suspended in or precipitated from a liquid

floes

floes
A flat mass of ice (smaller than an ice field) floating at sea

flogs

flogs
Beat severely with a whip or rod; "The teacher often flogged the students"; "The children were severely trounced"
Beat with a cane
Sell (slang)
Whipped

flong

flong
Imp. & p. p. of Fling.

flood

flood
(v. i.) A great flow of water; a body of moving water; the flowing stream, as of a river; especially, a body of water, rising, swelling, and overflowing land not usually thus covered; a deluge; a freshet; an inundation.
(v. i.) The flowing in of the tide; the semidiurnal swell or rise of water in the ocean; -- opposed to ebb; as, young flood; high flood.
(v. i.) A great flow or stream of any fluid substance; as, a flood of light; a flood of lava; hence, a great quantity widely diffused; an overflowing; a superabundance; as, a flood of bank notes; a flood of paper currency.
(v. i.) Menstrual disharge; menses.
(v. t.) To overflow; to inundate; to deluge; as, the swollen river flooded the valley.
(v. t.) To cause or permit to be inundated; to fill or cover with water or other fluid; as, to flood arable land for irrigation; to fill to excess or to its full capacity; as, to flood a country with a depreciated currency.

flook

flook
(n.) A fluke of an anchor.

floor

floor
(n.) The bottom or lower part of any room; the part upon which we stand and upon which the movables in the room are supported.
(n.) The structure formed of beams, girders, etc., with proper covering, which divides a building horizontally into stories. Floor in sense 1 is, then, the upper surface of floor in sense 2.
(n.) The surface, or the platform, of a structure on which we walk or travel; as, the floor of a bridge.
(n.) A story of a building. See Story.
(n.) The part of the house assigned to the members.
(n.) The right to speak.
(n.) That part of the bottom of a vessel on each side of the keelson which is most nearly horizontal.
(n.) The rock underlying a stratified or nearly horizontal deposit.
(n.) A horizontal, flat ore body.
(v. t.) To cover with a floor; to furnish with a floor; as, to floor a house with pine boards.
(v. t.) To strike down or lay level with the floor; to knock down; hence, to silence by a conclusive answer or retort; as, to floor an opponent.
(v. t.) To finish or make an end of; as, to floor a college examination.

flops

flops
Fall suddenly and abruptly
Fall loosely; "He flopped into a chair"
Fail utterly; collapse; "The project foundered"
The act of throwing yourself down; "he landed on the bed with a great flop"
A complete failure; "the play was a dismal flop"
Someone who is unsuccessful
An arithmetic operation performed on floating-point numbers; "this computer can perform a million flops per second"

flora

flora
(n.) The goddess of flowers and spring.
(n.) The complete system of vegetable species growing without cultivation in a given locality, region, or period; a list or description of, or treatise on, such plants.

flory

flory
United States chemist who developed methods for studying long-chain molecules (1910-1985)

flosh

flosh
(n.) A hopper-shaped box or /nortar in which ore is placed for the action of the stamps.

floss

floss
(n.) The slender styles of the pistillate flowers of maize; also called silk.
(n.) Untwisted filaments of silk, used in embroidering.
(n.) A small stream of water.
(n.) Fluid glass floating on iron in the puddling furnace, produced by the vitrification of oxides and earths which are present.

flota

flota
(n.) A fleet; especially, a /eet of Spanish ships which formerly sailed every year from Cadiz to Vera Cruz, in Mexico, to transport to Spain the production of Spanish America.

flote

flote
(n.) A wave.
(v. t.) To fleet; to skim.

flour

flour
(n.) The finely ground meal of wheat, or of any other grain; especially, the finer part of meal separated by bolting; hence, the fine and soft powder of any substance; as, flour of emery; flour of mustard.
(v. t.) To grind and bolt; to convert into flour; as, to flour wheat.
(v. t.) To sprinkle with flour.

flout

flout
(n.) A mock; an insult.
(v. i.) To practice mocking; to behave with contempt; to sneer; to fleer; -- often with at.
(v. t.) To mock or insult; to treat with contempt.

flowk

flowk
(n.) See 1st Fluke.

flown

flown
P. p. of Fly; -- often used with the auxiliary verb to be; as, the birds are flown.
(a.) Flushed, inflated.
(p. p.) of Fly

flows

flows
The act of flowing or streaming; continuous progression
Undergo menstruation; "She started menstruating at the age of 11"
The motion characteristic of fluids (liquids or gases)
Cover or swamp with water
Dominant course (suggestive of running water) of successive events or ideas; "two streams of development run through American history"; "stream of consciousness"; "the flow of thought"; "the current of history"
Fall or flow in a certain way; "This dress hangs well"; "Her long black hair flowed down her back"
Any uninterrupted stream or discharge
Move or progress freely as if in a stream; "The crowd flowed out of the stadium"
The monthly discharge of blood from the uterus of nonpregnant women from puberty to menopause; "the women were sickly and subject to excessive menstruation"; "a woman does not take the gout unless her menses be stopped"--Hippocrates; "the semen begins to appear in males and to be emitted
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