Click or tap here to find out how this works

Stuck on a crossword puzzle answer?

Enter the word you are trying to solve in the box below, using question marks in place of the letter(s) you don't know.

New! You can also search for definitions and anagrams by typing in a word without any question marks.

e.g. na?by?amby  /  hallobolua

dismiss
Tip: click or tap on a result to view its definition, and more!

Crossword Solver Solutions for: S???L

sabal

sabal
(n.) A genus of palm trees including the palmetto of the Southern United States.

salol

salol
(n.) A white crystalline substance consisting of phenol salicylate.

scall

scall
(a.) A scurf or scabby disease, especially of the scalp.
(a.) Scabby; scurfy.

scowl

scowl
(n.) The wrinkling of the brows or face in frowing; the expression of displeasure, sullenness, or discontent in the countenance; an angry frown.
(n.) Hence, gloom; dark or threatening aspect.
(v. i.) To wrinkle the brows, as in frowning or displeasure; to put on a frowning look; to look sour, sullen, severe, or angry.
(v. i.) Hence, to look gloomy, dark, or threatening; to lower.
(v. t.) To look at or repel with a scowl or a frown.
(v. t.) To express by a scowl; as, to scowl defiance.

scull

scull
(n.) The skull.
(n.) A shoal of fish.
(n.) A boat; a cockboat. See Sculler.
(n.) One of a pair of short oars worked by one person.
(n.) A single oar used at the stern in propelling a boat.
(n.) The common skua gull.
(v. i.) To impel a boat with a scull or sculls.
(v. t.) To impel (a boat) with a pair of sculls, or with a single scull or oar worked over the stern obliquely from side to side.

seoul

seoul
The capital of South Korea and the largest city of Asia; located in northwestern South Korea

sewel

sewel
(n.) A scarecrow, generally made of feathers tied to a string, hung up to prevent deer from breaking into a place.

shall

shall
(v. i. & auxiliary.) To owe; to be under obligation for.
(v. i. & auxiliary.) To be obliged; must.
(v. i. & auxiliary.) As an auxiliary, shall indicates a duty or necessity whose obligation is derived from the person speaking; as, you shall go; he shall go; that is, I order or promise your going. It thus ordinarily expresses, in the second and third persons, a command, a threat, or a promise. If the auxillary be emphasized, the command is made more imperative, the promise or that more positive and sure. It is also employed in the language of prophecy; as, "the day shall come when . . . , " since a promise or threat and an authoritative prophecy nearly coincide in significance. In shall with the first person, the necessity of the action is sometimes implied as residing elsewhere than in the speaker; as, I shall suffer; we shall see; and there is always a less distinct and positive assertion of his volition than is indicated by will. "I shall go" implies nearly a simple futurity; more exactly, a foretelling or an expectation of my going, in which, naturally enough, a certain degree of plan or intention may be included; emphasize the shall, and the event is described as certain to occur, and the expression approximates in meaning to our emphatic "I will go." In a question, the relation of speaker and source of obligation is of course transferred to the person addressed; as, "Shall you go?" (answer, "I shall go"); "Shall he go?" i. e., "Do you require or promise his going?" (answer, "He shall go".) The same relation is transferred to either second or third person in such phrases as "You say, or think, you shall go;" "He says, or thinks, he shall go." After a conditional conjunction (as if, whether) shall is used in all persons to express futurity simply; as, if I, you, or he shall say they are right. Should is everywhere used in the same connection and the same senses as shall, as its imperfect. It also expresses duty or moral obligation; as, he should do it whether he will or not. In the early English, and hence in our English Bible, shall is the auxiliary mainly used, in all the persons, to express simple futurity. (Cf. Will, v. t.) Shall may be used elliptically; thus, with an adverb or other word expressive of motion go may be omitted.

shawl

shawl
(n.) A square or oblong cloth of wool, cotton, silk, or other textile or netted fabric, used, especially by women, as a loose covering for the neck and shoulders.
(v. t.) To wrap in a shawl.

sheal

sheal
(n.) Same as Sheeling.
(n.) A shell or pod.
(v. t.) To put under a sheal or shelter.
(v. t.) To take the husks or pods off from; to shell; to empty of its contents, as a husk or a pod.

shell

shell
(n.) A hard outside covering, as of a fruit or an animal.
(n.) The covering, or outside part, of a nut; as, a hazelnut shell.
(n.) A pod.
(n.) The hard covering of an egg.
(n.) The hard calcareous or chitinous external covering of mollusks, crustaceans, and some other invertebrates. In some mollusks, as the cuttlefishes, it is internal, or concealed by the mantle. Also, the hard covering of some vertebrates, as the armadillo, the tortoise, and the like.
(n.) Hence, by extension, any mollusks having such a covering.
(n.) A hollow projectile, of various shapes, adapted for a mortar or a cannon, and containing an explosive substance, ignited with a fuse or by percussion, by means of which the projectile is burst and its fragments scattered. See Bomb.
(n.) The case which holds the powder, or charge of powder and shot, used with breechloading small arms.
(n.) Any slight hollow structure; a framework, or exterior structure, regarded as not complete or filled in; as, the shell of a house.
(n.) A coarse kind of coffin; also, a thin interior coffin inclosed in a more substantial one.
(n.) An instrument of music, as a lyre, -- the first lyre having been made, it is said, by drawing strings over a tortoise shell.
(n.) An engraved copper roller used in print works.
(n.) The husks of cacao seeds, a decoction of which is often used as a substitute for chocolate, cocoa, etc.
(n.) The outer frame or case of a block within which the sheaves revolve.
(n.) A light boat the frame of which is covered with thin wood or with paper; as, a racing shell.
(v. i.) To fall off, as a shell, crust, etc.
(v. i.) To cast the shell, or exterior covering; to fall out of the pod or husk; as, nuts shell in falling.
(v. i.) To be disengaged from the ear or husk; as, wheat or rye shells in reaping.
(v. t.) To strip or break off the shell of; to take out of the shell, pod, etc.; as, to shell nuts or pease; to shell oysters.
(v. t.) To separate the kernels of (an ear of Indian corn, wheat, oats, etc.) from the cob, ear, or husk.
(v. t.) To throw shells or bombs upon or into; to bombard; as, to shell a town.

sheol

sheol
(n.) The place of departed spirits; Hades; also, the grave.

shill

shill
(v. t.) To shell.
(v. t.) To put under cover; to sheal.

shirl

shirl
(a.) Shrill.
(n.) See Schorl.

shoal

shoal
(a.) Having little depth; shallow; as, shoal water.
(n.) A great multitude assembled; a crowd; a throng; -- said especially of fish; as, a shoal of bass.
(n.) A place where the water of a sea, lake, river, pond, etc., is shallow; a shallow.
(n.) A sandbank or bar which makes the water shoal.
(v. i.) To assemble in a multitude; to throng; as, the fishes shoaled about the place.
(v. i.) To become shallow; as, the color of the water shows where it shoals.
(v. t.) To cause to become more shallow; to come to a more shallow part of; as, a ship shoals her water by advancing into that which is less deep.

shorl

shorl
(a.) Alt. of Shorlaceous

sibyl

sibyl
(n.) A woman supposed to be endowed with a spirit of prophecy.
(n.) A female fortune teller; a pythoness; a prophetess.

sigil

sigil
(n.) A seal; a signature.

sisal

sisal
Mexican or West Indian plant with large fleshy leaves yielding a stiff fiber used in e.g. rope
A plant fiber used for making rope
LOAD MORE RESULTS