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Crossword Answers for: S?C?E?

sachem

sachem
(n.) A chief of a tribe of the American Indians; a sagamore.

sacked

sacked
(imp. & p. p.) of Sack

sacker

sacker
(n.) One who sacks; one who takes part in the storm and pillage of a town.

sacred

sacred
(a.) Set apart by solemn religious ceremony; especially, in a good sense, made holy; set apart to religious use; consecrated; not profane or common; as, a sacred place; a sacred day; sacred service.
(a.) Relating to religion, or to the services of religion; not secular; religious; as, sacred history.
(a.) Designated or exalted by a divine sanction; possessing the highest title to obedience, honor, reverence, or veneration; entitled to extreme reverence; venerable.
(a.) Hence, not to be profaned or violated; inviolable.
(a.) Consecrated; dedicated; devoted; -- with to.
(a.) Solemnly devoted, in a bad sense, as to evil, vengeance, curse, or the like; accursed; baleful.

seckel

seckel
(n.) A small reddish brown sweet and juicy pear. It originated on a farm near Philadelphia, afterwards owned by a Mr. Seckel.

secret

secret
(a.) Hidden; concealed; as, secret treasure; secret plans; a secret vow.
(a.) Withdraw from general intercourse or notice; in retirement or secrecy; secluded.
(a.) Faithful to a secret; not inclined to divulge or betray confidence; secretive.
(a.) Separate; distinct.
(a.) Something studiously concealed; a thing kept from general knowledge; what is not revealed, or not to be revealed.
(a.) A thing not discovered; what is unknown or unexplained; a mystery.
(a.) The parts which modesty and propriety require to be concealed; the genital organs.
(v. t.) To keep secret.

sicked

sicked
Urge to attack someone; "The owner sicked his dogs on the intruders"; "the shaman sics sorcerers on the evil spirits"

sicken

sicken
(v. i.) To become sick; to fall into disease.
(v. i.) To be filled to disgust; to be disgusted or nauseated; to be filled with abhorrence or aversion; to be surfeited or satiated.
(v. i.) To become disgusting or tedious.
(v. i.) To become weak; to decay; to languish.
(v. t.) To make sick; to disease.
(v. t.) To make qualmish; to nauseate; to disgust; as, to sicken the stomach.
(v. t.) To impair; to weaken.

sicker

sicker
(a.) Alt. of Siker
(adv.) Alt. of Siker
(v. i.) To percolate, trickle, or ooze, as water through a crack.

soccer

soccer
A football game in which two teams of 11 players try to kick or head a ball into the opponents' goal

socket

socket
(n.) An opening into which anything is fitted; any hollow thing or place which receives and holds something else; as, the sockets of the teeth.
(n.) Especially, the hollow tube or place in which a candle is fixed in the candlestick.

socles

socles
A plain plinth that supports a wall

sucked

sucked
(imp. & p. p.) of Suck

sucken

sucken
(n.) The jurisdiction of a mill, or that extent of ground astricted to it, the tenants of which are bound to bring their grain thither to be ground.

sucker

sucker
(n.) One who, or that which, sucks; esp., one of the organs by which certain animals, as the octopus and remora, adhere to other bodies.
(n.) A suckling; a sucking animal.
(n.) The embolus, or bucket, of a pump; also, the valve of a pump basket.
(n.) A pipe through which anything is drawn.
(n.) A small piece of leather, usually round, having a string attached to the center, which, when saturated with water and pressed upon a stone or other body having a smooth surface, adheres, by reason of the atmospheric pressure, with such force as to enable a considerable weight to be thus lifted by the string; -- used by children as a plaything.
(n.) A shoot from the roots or lower part of the stem of a plant; -- so called, perhaps, from diverting nourishment from the body of the plant.
(n.) Any one of numerous species of North American fresh-water cyprinoid fishes of the family Catostomidae; so called because the lips are protrusile. The flesh is coarse, and they are of little value as food. The most common species of the Eastern United States are the northern sucker (Catostomus Commersoni), the white sucker (C. teres), the hog sucker (C. nigricans), and the chub, or sweet sucker (Erimyzon sucetta). Some of the large Western species are called buffalo fish, red horse, black horse, and suckerel.
(n.) The remora.
(n.) The lumpfish.
(n.) The hagfish, or myxine.
(n.) A California food fish (Menticirrus undulatus) closely allied to the kingfish (a); -- called also bagre.
(n.) A parasite; a sponger. See def. 6, above.
(n.) A hard drinker; a soaker.
(n.) A greenhorn; one easily gulled.
(n.) A nickname applied to a native of Illinois.
(v. i.) To form suckers; as, corn suckers abundantly.
(v. t.) To strip off the suckers or shoots from; to deprive of suckers; as, to sucker maize.

sucket

sucket
(v. t.) A sweetmeat; a dainty morsel.