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Crossword Solutions for: S?R??G??

scragged

scragged
(a.) Rough with irregular points, or a broken surface; scraggy; as, a scragged backbone.
(a.) Lean and rough; scraggy.

scraggly

scraggly
Lacking neatness or order; "the old man's scraggly beard"; "a scraggly little path to the door"

scringed

scringed
(imp. & p. p.) of Scrine

scrooges

scrooges
A selfish person who is unwilling to give or spend

shragger

shragger
(n.) One who lops; one who trims trees.

sprigged

sprigged
(a.) Having sprigs.
(imp. & p. p.) of Sprig

springal

springal
(a.) Alt. of Springall
(n.) An ancient military engine for casting stones and arrows by means of a spring.

springer

springer
(n.) One who, or that which, springs; specifically, one who rouses game.
(n.) A young plant.
(n.) The impost, or point at which an arch rests upon its support, and from which it seems to spring.
(n.) The bottom stone of an arch, which lies on the impost. The skew back is one form of springer.
(n.) The rib of a groined vault, as being the solid abutment for each section of vaulting.
(n.) The grampus.
(n.) A variety of the field spaniel. See Spaniel.
(n.) A species of antelope; the sprinkbok.

straggle

straggle
(n.) The act of straggling.
(v. t.) To wander from the direct course or way; to rove; to stray; to wander from the line of march or desert the line of battle; as, when troops are on the march, the men should not straggle.
(v. t.) To wander at large; to roam idly about; to ramble.
(v. t.) To escape or stretch beyond proper limits, as the branches of a plant; to spread widely apart; to shoot too far or widely in growth.
(v. t.) To be dispersed or separated; to occur at intervals.

straggly

straggly
Growing or spreading sparsely or irregularly; "straggly ivy"
Spreading out in different directions; "sprawling handwriting"; "straggling branches"; "straggly hair"

straight

straight
(a.) A variant of Strait, a.
(adv.) In a straight manner; directly; rightly; forthwith; immediately; as, the arrow went straight to the mark.
(n.) A hand of five cards in consecutive order as to value; a sequence. When they are of one suit, it is calles straight flush.
(superl.) Right, in a mathematical sense; passing from one point to another by the nearest course; direct; not deviating or crooked; as, a straight line or course; a straight piece of timber.
(superl.) Approximately straight; not much curved; as, straight ribs are such as pass from the base of a leaf to the apex, with a small curve.
(superl.) Composed of cards which constitute a regular sequence, as the ace, king, queen, jack, and ten-spot; as, a straight hand; a straight flush.
(superl.) Conforming to justice and rectitude; not deviating from truth or fairness; upright; as, straight dealing.
(superl.) Unmixed; undiluted; as, to take liquor straight.
(superl.) Making no exceptions or deviations in one's support of the organization and candidates of a political party; as, a straight Republican; a straight Democrat; also, containing the names of all the regularly nominated candidates of a party and no others; as, a straight ballot.
(v. t.) To straighten.

stranger

stranger
(n.) One who is strange, foreign, or unknown.
(n.) One who comes from a foreign land; a foreigner.
(n.) One whose home is at a distance from the place where he is, but in the same country.
(n.) One who is unknown or unacquainted; as, the gentleman is a stranger to me; hence, one not admitted to communication, fellowship, or acquaintance.
(n.) One not belonging to the family or household; a guest; a visitor.
(n.) One not privy or party an act, contract, or title; a mere intruder or intermeddler; one who interferes without right; as, actual possession of land gives a good title against a stranger having no title; as to strangers, a mortgage is considered merely as a pledge; a mere stranger to the levy.
(v. t.) To estrange; to alienate.

strangle

strangle
(v. i.) To be strangled, or suffocated.
(v. t.) To compress the windpipe of (a person or animal) until death results from stoppage of respiration; to choke to death by compressing the throat, as with the hand or a rope.
(v. t.) To stifle, choke, or suffocate in any manner.
(v. t.) To hinder from appearance; to stifle; to suppress.

straught

straught
Imp. & p. p. of Stretch.
(v. t.) To stretch; to make straight.

strength

strength
(n.) The quality or state of being strong; ability to do or to bear; capacity for exertion or endurance, whether physical, intellectual, or moral; force; vigor; power; as, strength of body or of the arm; strength of mind, of memory, or of judgment.
(n.) Power to resist force; solidity or toughness; the quality of bodies by which they endure the application of force without breaking or yielding; -- in this sense opposed to frangibility; as, the strength of a bone, of a beam, of a wall, a rope, and the like.
(n.) Power of resisting attacks; impregnability.
(n.) That quality which tends to secure results; effective power in an institution or enactment; security; validity; legal or moral force; logical conclusiveness; as, the strength of social or legal obligations; the strength of law; the strength of public opinion; strength of evidence; strength of argument.
(n.) One who, or that which, is regarded as embodying or affording force, strength, or firmness; that on which confidence or reliance is based; support; security.
(n.) Force as measured; amount, numbers, or power of any body, as of an army, a navy, and the like; as, what is the strength of the enemy by land, or by sea?
(n.) Vigor or style; force of expression; nervous diction; -- said of literary work.
(n.) Intensity; -- said of light or color.
(n.) Intensity or degree of the distinguishing and essential element; spirit; virtue; excellence; -- said of liquors, solutions, etc.; as, the strength of wine or of acids.
(n.) A strong place; a stronghold.
(v. t.) To strengthen.

stringed

stringed
Of String
(a.) Having strings; as, a stringed instrument.
(a.) Produced by strings.

stringer

stringer
(n.) One who strings; one who makes or provides strings, especially for bows.
(n.) A libertine; a wencher.
(n.) A longitudinal sleeper.
(n.) A streak of planking carried round the inside of a vessel on the under side of the beams.
(n.) A long horizontal timber to connect uprights in a frame, or to support a floor or the like.

stronger

stronger
Strong and sure; "a firm grasp"; "gave a strong pull on the rope"
Freshly made or left; "a warm trail"; "the scent is warm"
Being distilled rather than fermented; having a high alcoholic content; "hard liquor"
Not faint or feeble; "a strong odor of burning rubber"
Having a strong physiological or chemical effect; "a potent toxin"; "potent liquor"; "a potent cup of tea", "a stiff drink"
Having or wielding force or authority; "providing the ground soldier with increasingly potent weapons"
Of verbs not having standard (or regular) inflection; "`sing' is a strong verb"
Of good quality and condition; solidly built; "a solid foundation"; "several substantial timber buildings"
Having strength or power greater than average or expected; "a strong radio signal"; "strong medicine"; "a strong man"
Immune to attack; incapable of being tampered with; "an impregnable fortress"; "fortifications that made the fron

strongly

strongly
(adv.) In a strong manner; so as to be strong in action or in resistance; with strength; with great force; forcibly; powerfully; firmly; vehemently; as, a town strongly fortified; he objected strongly.
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