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Crossword Answers for: W??K

walk

walk
(n.) The act of walking, or moving on the feet with a slow pace; advance without running or leaping.
(n.) The act of walking for recreation or exercise; as, a morning walk; an evening walk.
(n.) Manner of walking; gait; step; as, we often know a person at a distance by his walk.
(n.) That in or through which one walks; place or distance walked over; a place for walking; a path or avenue prepared for foot passengers, or for taking air and exercise; way; road; hence, a place or region in which animals may graze; place of wandering; range; as, a sheep walk.
(n.) A frequented track; habitual place of action; sphere; as, the walk of the historian.
(n.) Conduct; course of action; behavior.
(n.) The route or district regularly served by a vender; as, a milkman's walk.
(v. i.) To move along on foot; to advance by steps; to go on at a moderate pace; specifically, of two-legged creatures, to proceed at a slower or faster rate, but without running, or lifting one foot entirely before the other touches the ground.
(v. i.) To move or go on the feet for exercise or amusement; to take one's exercise; to ramble.
(v. i.) To be stirring; to be abroad; to go restlessly about; -- said of things or persons expected to remain quiet, as a sleeping person, or the spirit of a dead person; to go about as a somnambulist or a specter.
(v. i.) To be in motion; to act; to move; to wag.
(v. i.) To behave; to pursue a course of life; to conduct one's self.
(v. i.) To move off; to depart.
(v. t.) To pass through, over, or upon; to traverse; to perambulate; as, to walk the streets.
(v. t.) To cause to walk; to lead, drive, or ride with a slow pace; as to walk one's horses.
(v. t.) To subject, as cloth or yarn, to the fulling process; to full.

wank

wank
Get sexual gratification through self-stimulation
Slang for masturbation

wark

wark
(n.) Work; a building.

weak

weak
(a.) To make or become weak; to weaken.
(v. i.) Wanting physical strength.
(v. i.) Deficient in strength of body; feeble; infirm; sickly; debilitated; enfeebled; exhausted.
(v. i.) Not able to sustain a great weight, pressure, or strain; as, a weak timber; a weak rope.
(v. i.) Not firmly united or adhesive; easily broken or separated into pieces; not compact; as, a weak ship.
(v. i.) Not stiff; pliant; frail; soft; as, the weak stalk of a plant.
(v. i.) Not able to resist external force or onset; easily subdued or overcome; as, a weak barrier; as, a weak fortress.
(v. i.) Lacking force of utterance or sound; not sonorous; low; small; feeble; faint.
(v. i.) Not thoroughly or abundantly impregnated with the usual or required ingredients, or with stimulating and nourishing substances; of less than the usual strength; as, weak tea, broth, or liquor; a weak decoction or solution; a weak dose of medicine.
(v. i.) Lacking ability for an appropriate function or office; as, weak eyes; a weak stomach; a weak magistrate; a weak regiment, or army.
(v. i.) Not possessing or manifesting intellectual, logical, moral, or political strength, vigor, etc.
(v. i.) Feeble of mind; wanting discernment; lacking vigor; spiritless; as, a weak king or magistrate.
(v. i.) Resulting from, or indicating, lack of judgment, discernment, or firmness; unwise; hence, foolish.
(v. i.) Not having full confidence or conviction; not decided or confirmed; vacillating; wavering.
(v. i.) Not able to withstand temptation, urgency, persuasion, etc.; easily impressed, moved, or overcome; accessible; vulnerable; as, weak resolutions; weak virtue.
(v. i.) Wanting in power to influence or bind; as, weak ties; a weak sense of honor of duty.
(v. i.) Not having power to convince; not supported by force of reason or truth; unsustained; as, a weak argument or case.
(v. i.) Wanting in point or vigor of expression; as, a weak sentence; a weak style.
(v. i.) Not prevalent or effective, or not felt to be prevalent; not potent; feeble.
(v. i.) Lacking in elements of political strength; not wielding or having authority or energy; deficient in the resources that are essential to a ruler or nation; as, a weak monarch; a weak government or state.
(v. i.) Tending towards lower prices; as, a weak market.
(v. i.) Pertaining to, or designating, a verb which forms its preterit (imperfect) and past participle by adding to the present the suffix -ed, -d, or the variant form -t; as in the verbs abash, abashed; abate, abated; deny, denied; feel, felt. See Strong, 19 (a).
(v. i.) Pertaining to, or designating, a noun in Anglo-Saxon, etc., the stem of which ends in -n. See Strong, 19 (b).

week

week
(n.) A period of seven days, usually that reckoned from one Sabbath or Sunday to the next.

welk

welk
(n.) A pustule. See 2d Whelk.
(n.) A whelk.
(v. i.) To wither; to fade; also, to decay; to decline; to wane.
(v. t.) To cause to wither; to wilt.
(v. t.) To contract; to shorten.
(v. t.) To soak; also, to beat severely.

werk

werk
(v.) Alt. of Werke

wick

wick
(n.) Alt. of Wich
(n.) A bundle of fibers, or a loosely twisted or braided cord, tape, or tube, usually made of soft spun cotton threads, which by capillary attraction draws up a steady supply of the oil in lamps, the melted tallow or wax in candles, or other material used for illumination, in small successive portions, to be burned.
(v. i.) To strike a stone in an oblique direction.

wilk

wilk
(n.) See Whelk.

wink

wink
(n.) The act of closing, or closing and opening, the eyelids quickly; hence, the time necessary for such an act; a moment.
(n.) A hint given by shutting the eye with a significant cast.
(v. i.) To nod; to sleep; to nap.
(v. i.) To shut the eyes quickly; to close the eyelids with a quick motion.
(v. i.) To close and open the eyelids quickly; to nictitate; to blink.
(v. i.) To give a hint by a motion of the eyelids, often those of one eye only.
(v. i.) To avoid taking notice, as if by shutting the eyes; to connive at anything; to be tolerant; -- generally with at.
(v. i.) To be dim and flicker; as, the light winks.
(v. t.) To cause (the eyes) to wink.

wonk

wonk
A person who takes excessive interest in trivial matters
An insignificant student who is ridiculed as being affected or boringly studious

wook

wook
(imp.) Woke.

work

work
(n.) Exertion of strength or faculties; physical or intellectual effort directed to an end; industrial activity; toil; employment; sometimes, specifically, physically labor.
(n.) The matter on which one is at work; that upon which one spends labor; material for working upon; subject of exertion; the thing occupying one; business; duty; as, to take up one's work; to drop one's work.
(n.) That which is produced as the result of labor; anything accomplished by exertion or toil; product; performance; fabric; manufacture; in a more general sense, act, deed, service, effect, result, achievement, feat.
(n.) Specifically: (a) That which is produced by mental labor; a composition; a book; as, a work, or the works, of Addison. (b) Flowers, figures, or the like, wrought with the needle; embroidery.
(n.) Structures in civil, military, or naval engineering, as docks, bridges, embankments, trenches, fortifications, and the like; also, the structures and grounds of a manufacturing establishment; as, iron works; locomotive works; gas works.
(n.) The moving parts of a mechanism; as, the works of a watch.
(n.) Manner of working; management; treatment; as, unskillful work spoiled the effect.
(n.) The causing of motion against a resisting force. The amount of work is proportioned to, and is measured by, the product of the force into the amount of motion along the direction of the force. See Conservation of energy, under Conservation, Unit of work, under Unit, also Foot pound, Horse power, Poundal, and Erg.
(n.) Ore before it is dressed.
(n.) Performance of moral duties; righteous conduct.
(n.) To exert one's self for a purpose; to put forth effort for the attainment of an object; to labor; to be engaged in the performance of a task, a duty, or the like.
(n.) Hence, in a general sense, to operate; to act; to perform; as, a machine works well.
(n.) Hence, figuratively, to be effective; to have effect or influence; to conduce.
(n.) To carry on business; to be engaged or employed customarily; to perform the part of a laborer; to labor; to toil.
(n.) To be in a state of severe exertion, or as if in such a state; to be tossed or agitated; to move heavily; to strain; to labor; as, a ship works in a heavy sea.
(n.) To make one's way slowly and with difficulty; to move or penetrate laboriously; to proceed with effort; -- with a following preposition, as down, out, into, up, through, and the like; as, scheme works out by degrees; to work into the earth.
(n.) To ferment, as a liquid.
(n.) To act or operate on the stomach and bowels, as a cathartic.
(v. t.) To labor or operate upon; to give exertion and effort to; to prepare for use, or to utilize, by labor.
(v. t.) To produce or form by labor; to bring forth by exertion or toil; to accomplish; to originate; to effect; as, to work wood or iron into a form desired, or into a utensil; to work cotton or wool into cloth.
(v. t.) To produce by slow degrees, or as if laboriously; to bring gradually into any state by action or motion.
(v. t.) To influence by acting upon; to prevail upon; to manage; to lead.
(v. t.) To form with a needle and thread or yarn; especially, to embroider; as, to work muslin.
(v. t.) To set in motion or action; to direct the action of; to keep at work; to govern; to manage; as, to work a machine.
(v. t.) To cause to ferment, as liquor.